Electronics

USB Switch Tester

Overview

The USB Switch Tester is a device used to test the functionality of an assistive switch with a 3.5 mm connection. This device allows the user to determine if their assistive switch is working. This device is not able to be used as a switch interface but rather lights up the red LED light if the switch is pressed and functional. The device is able to be plugged into a powered USB port to be conveniently used without the need for batteries. This is an alternative to the Simple Switch Tester design.

This device is intended to be used by users of assistive switches or disability professionals to confirm whether an assistive switch is functional.

Usage

When an assistive switch is pressed and connected to the USB Switch tester, the LED light on the tester will light up if the assistive switch is functional. If the LED does not light up when pressed, the adaptive switch is not functioning properly.

The USB Switch Tester is intended to use the existing USB power sources or USB power adapters which are very common as the power source. USB power adapters are available in most households and can be purchased locally.

Cost

~ $30.00 CAD

Build Instructions

The USB Switch Tester requires 3D printing an external shell and soldering of electrical components on a custom PCB. All electrical components are off the shelf, with the exception of the custom PCB board.

Skills Required

  • 3D printing
  • Soldering

Time Required

  • 3D Print Time: 27 min
  • Assembly time: 1 hr

Tools

  • 3D printer
  • Soldering Iron/Solder
  • Hobby Knife

Components

3D Printing

All components can be printed with no support at 20% infill with a 0.2mm layer height. All pieces can be printed using PLA filament.

  • 1X USB Switch Tester Bottom Case
  • 1X USB Switch Tester Top Case

Custom PCB

A custom PCB is required for this design. The Gerber files can be found on GitHub for manufacturing.

Attribution

This is a Makers Making Change original design by Milad Hajihassan and Derrick Andrews.

My Pal Scout/Violet Switch Adapted Toy

Overview

The switch adapted My Pal Scout/Violet sings songs and can be controlled with accessible switches that have a 3.5mm jack. The My Pal is a LeapFrog toy that sings lullabies and learning songs, and has activities with numbers, animals, food, and more.

Usage

You can use the My Pal Scout/Violet by plugging in one to four AT switches. The cable clamp labels which function each audio lead controls. Then, press the AT switches, or the in-toy buttons, to activate the various songs and activities.

Build Instructions

You can build the My Pal Scout/Violet by following the Assembly Guide attached. Follow the “How to prep your 3.5mm headphone jack” tutorial first to prepare for this toy adaption.

Bill of Materials

1 x LeapFrog My Pal Scout or Violet Toy (https://www.amazon.ca/LeapFrog-Pal-Violet-English-Version/dp/B00D2KZ1ZY?th=1)

4 x 3.5mm Female Headphone jacks (something like two of  these cut in half: (Amazon Canada)

8 x Crimp Connectors (Amazon Canada)

1 x 3D Printed Clamp

2 x #4 Metal Screw, 3/8″ Length (Amazon Canada)

1 x 4″ Zip Tie (Amazon Canada)

1 x 18″ Zip Tie (Amazon Canada

Electrical Tape

 

Note: Other wire connections aside from the crimp connectors can be used, such as UR2 connectors, Marrettes, or even soldering the connections.

Tools

  • Needle Nose Pliers (or Wire Crimpers, or Vise Grips)
    • Crimping tool is recommended if available
  • Wire Cutters
  • Wire Strippers

Attribution

Original Device: ATmakers

Updated Design: Makers Making Change

Enabled Controller Wireless

Overview

The Enabled Controller Wireless is an open-source switch interface that enables adaptive switches and analog joysticks to be used with a compatible Bluetooth device such as a computer, tablet, or phone. The switches and/or joysticks can be used to input keyboard, mouse, or joystick commands, depending on how the device is configured. The device accepts up to 8 adaptive switches (3.5 mm) and up to two dual axis analog joysticks as inputs.

The Enabled Controller Wireless can emulate a Bluetooth keyboard or a Bluetooth mouse.

Usage

  1. Connect assistive switch(es) to the appropriate input port(s). The switch input ports are labeled  A, B, C, D, Left, Down, Right, Up.
  2. Connect analog joysticks to the desired joystick input ports. The joystick input ports are labelled A1 and A2.
  3. Connect a micro USB cable to the Power Bank to power the Enabled Controller Wireless if you are not using the internal battery.
  4. Connect the Enabled Controller Wireless to the host device (e.g. computer, tablet) via Bluetooth.
    • Turn On the Bluetooth feature on the host device.
    • Scan and find a device named “Enabled-Controller”.
    • Pair and connect the host device to the “Enabled-Controller”
    • The RGB LED will turn to blue on successful connection attempt.
  5. Activation of the switches or movement of the joysticks will result in different actions depending on the software version and operating mode.

Features:

The Wireless version emulates a keyboard or a mouse. Refer to the Enabled Controller Wireless User Manual for more details.

The USB version offers the following four modes:
1) Keyboard switch

When a connected switch is activated, the device transmits a customizable keystroke.

2) Keyboard Morse Code

Two connected switches are used to input Morse code dots and dashes. Theses dots and dashes are converted to characters and transmitted as keystrokes.

3) Mouse Morse Code

Two connected switches are used to input Morse code dots and dashes. These dots and dashes are converted to and transmitted as mouse commands.

4) Mouse

5) Settings

( Used to change reaction time )

The mode is changed by performing a long press on a switch connected to input D.

Build Instructions

A complete set of documentation, including Bill of Materials, Assembly Guide, and User guide are available at the GitHub link.

The estimated cost of the Enabled Controller Wireless is $77 CAD. The device consists of a number of off-the-shelf electronic components, a custom printed circuit board, a 3d printed enclosure, and some mechanical fasteners.

Voice It

Overview

The Voice It is a simple DIY device for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) . It reads the text stored on an RFID tag, then looks for an audio file on its SD card with the same name, and plays the file through the internal speaker. You control which objects have an RFID tag and you control what’s contained in the audio file.

The Bliss Tactile Symbols, by default, include an internal pocket, just big enough to hold a simple RFID tag. The Voice It comes with English and Spanish sound files for each of the 241 out-of-the-box tactile symbols.

You can also attach an RFID tag to any physical object and encode that tag with text using an inexpensive, RFID tag writer. The Voice It SD card can be removed and additional audio files can be added using a PC.

By default, the Voice It “talks” in English but you can easily create an RFID-based language token to switch the language to Spanish or any other language you’ve put on the SD card.

 

Usage

When an object or tactile symbol with an appropriate RFID tag is brought in proximity to the Voice It device, it will say the corresponding word or play the corresponding sound.

 

Build Instructions

Detailed build instructions and an assembly video are available at the link. The total cost of materials for the device is approximately $150. A suitable RFID reader/writer will also be required.

The build consists of 3D printed parts and electronics that are assembled without any soldering. The Arduino microcontroller needs to be flashed with firmware, and the sounds files will need to be transferred to the memory card.

 

 

 

 

Assistive Switches Kit

Switches are assistive devices used by people with limited dexterity. They can be used for many purposes including accessing phones, computers, TV set top boxes, adapted toys, and appliances.

Switches can also be used for adaptive gaming, which levels the playing field for gamers with disabilities. The switches in this kit are compatible with the Xbox Adaptive Controller and PC gaming on Windows 10 (click here for an XAC setup tutorial). External devices such as switches, buttons, mounts and joysticks can be arranged in a way to meet the needs of the gamer making it uniquely theirs. Adaptive gaming allows the user to completely individualize their gaming setup.

The Adaptive Switches Kit is composed of 5 switches:

  • 1 x raindrop switch– Low force switch well-suited for use by a finger or head
  • 1 x light touch switch – Low force switch well-suited for use by a finger.
  • 1 x interact switch – Medium force switch that is activated through applying pressure on the top surface.
  • 2 x round flexure switch – Medium force switch that is activated through applying pressure on the top surface.

All devices are 3D printed and made by volunteer makers in Canada and the US at one of our build events.

Braille Calculator

Overview

The Braille Calculator uses a Makey Makey Classic, 3D printed Braille, and a scratch project to allow users to do simple addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division, with audio feedback. The calculator allows the user to input a mathematical expression, guess the answer, and finally gives the correct answer. The calculator then audibly verifies if the user’s answer was correct or incorrect. This device can be used with any PC, tablet, phone, or device with a USB (type-A) port and internet connection.

Usage

This device is intended for individuals with a visual impairment in an education setting to practice math. The user is able to interact with an online calculator project created in Scratch that audibly interacts with their inputs using the brass contact points. The calculator includes 3D printed Braille labels of what each contact point represents. The calculator is capable of performing a single multiplication, division, addition, or subtraction action at a time. This calculator is compatible with any device that has a USB (type-A) port and an internet connection.

An example of the usage of this device is in the photos and video section of the GitHub page linked above.

Build Instructions

An assembly guide can be found in the documentation on this device page. If you are fulfilling a request for this device, please take a look at the maker checklist document before you start the build to help walk you through the process.

SKILLS REQUIRED

  • 3D Printing
  • Assembly

TOOLS

  • Glue (hot glue, stick glue, etc)
  • 3D printer
  • Scissors
  • Ink Printer
  • Wire stripper

COMPONENTS

3D PRINTING

Device requires 19 3D printed Braille labels. These are quick and take minimal filament. The 3D print files are downloadable on this page and do not require supports to print. The 3D printing guide file gives recommendations on settings for a successful print.

Attribution

Through our partnership with Makey Makey, Katie Butzu, and Mark Lyons, workshops were hosted to help disability professionals learn how they could gamify their work. Then we challenged these disability professionals to create their own assistive technology for clients! This project was created by Tracy Zhang and modified by the MMC team to include 3D printed Braille.

ATMakers KeySwitch

Overview

The ATMakers Keyswitch is a low-cost assistive switch interface that allows a user to connect up to 5 external assistive switches with 3.5 mm plugs to a computer, tablet, smartphone, or AAC device with a USB port.  The Keyswitch sends keystrokes and/or mouse movement when the external switches are activated, and can easily be configured to change the keystrokes that are sent.

Usage

Connect one and up to 5 assistive switches to the ATMakers Keyswitch. Plug the USB cable into the computer, tablet, smartphone, or AAC device with a USB port.

Build Instructions

Bill of Materials

To assemble the mount with the switch, you will need:
1 – 3D Printed Enclosure Base (~14 g of filament, $0.40; 1hr 15m)

1 – 3D Printed Enclosure Top (~ 7 g of filament, $0.20; 0hr 25m)

10 – Breakaway Male Headers (~1.20 CAD, https://www.digikey.ca/en/products/detail/wurth-electronics-inc/61301611121/4846854)

1 – ATMakers KeySwitch Custom PCB

5  – 3.5 mm jacks (~$1 ea, https://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/cui-inc/SJ1-3535NG/CP1-3535NG-ND/738699)

1 – Trinket M0 (~$12 CAD, https://www.digikey.ca/en/products/detail/adafruit-industries-llc/3500/7623049; https://www.adafruit.com/product/3500 )

1 – USB Micro to USB A Cable

2 – M2.6x 8 mm or #4-40 screws

Tools

  • Soldering iron
  • Wire strippers / wire cutters
  • Screwdriver

Custom PCB

The files for the custom PCB are stored on the ATMaker Hardware Github repository (https://github.com/ATMakersOrg/ATMakers-Hardware/tree/master/KeySwitchBoard). A board will need to be ordered from a suitable PCB manufacturer.

3D Printing

Both the enclosure and the base are designed to print without support. There are two version of the top – one designed for translucent filament and one for opaque filament. The print files are available on Thingiverse (https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3159609).

Assembling the KeySwitch

See the attached PDF for detailed step-by-step assembly instructions. There is also a video of the assembly process available: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tr9n-Ne0utA

Programming the Trinket

The instructions and code for programming the Trinket are available at the ATMaker KeySwitch repository (https://github.com/ATMakersOrg/KeySwitch).

Attribution

The ATMaker Keyswitch was designed by ATMakers. Written assembly instructions were created by Makers Making Change.

 

Arm Cycle Gaming Interface

Overview

The Arm Cycle Gaming Interface or Xbox One Arm Cycle Controller is an exercise device that interfaces a commercial mini-exercise bicycle / arm cycle with an Xbox Adaptive Controller to provide an interactive fitness experience targeted towards users with spinal cord injuries.

A sensor is added to the Arm Cycle to measure the direction and speed of pedaling. The Arm Cycle is mounted in a frame that allows the Arm Cycle to tilt left and right, which a second sensor measures. The sensor signals are interpreted by the Xbox Adaptive Controller as joystick and trigger inputs, allowing the device to play racing games on compatible platforms (e.g., Xbox One Series consoles, Windows 10 PCs, and other devices compatible with the Xbox Adaptive Controller).

This device was designed for the Sunny Health & Fitness SF-B0418 Magnetic Mini Exercise Bike, but it could be adapted for use with other similar arm cycles.

Usage

Place the adapted Arm Cycle and the Mechanical Adaptor frame onto a suitable surface like a table.

Connect the cables from the Arm Cycle Adaptive Controller to the corresponding input ports on the Xbox Adaptive Controller.

Connect the Xbox Adaptive Controller to the gaming platform.

Moving the pedals forward will emulate pressing the right trigger down on a controller, with greater speeds resulting in larger input. In most racing games, this would be mapped to acceleration, so that faster pedaling will result in greater acceleration of the vehicle.

Moving the pedals backwards will emulate a left trigger press, with greater speeds resulting in larger input. In most racing games this would be mapped to deceleration, resulting in brakes and eventually driving in reverse.

Moving and pivoting the Arm Cycle from right to left will emulate left stick X-axis movement. This is typically mapped to steering, so that tipping the Arm Cycle to the left will turn the vehicle to the left, and tipping the Arm Cycle to the right will turn the vehicle to the right.

Build Instructions

A detailed assembly and setup guide is available at the Instructables link.

The adapter for the existing arm cycle is made out of a mixture of 3D printed components and 80/20 aluminum extrusions, fasteners, and pivots.

Attribution

This device was designed as part of a UBC capstone project by five students: Nicholas Winship, Scott Beaulieu, Keith Consolacion, Edward Luo, and Fabian Lozano.

Enabled Controller Mini

Overview

The Enabled Controller Mini is an open-source switch interface that enables adaptive switches and analog joysticks to be used with a compatible USB device such as a computer, tablet, or phone. The switches and/or joysticks can be used to input keyboard, mouse, or joystick/gamepad commands, depending on how the device is configured. The device accepts up to 4 adaptive switches (3.5 mm) and one dual axis analog joysticks as inputs. The Enabled Controller Mini is smaller and more affordable version of the Enabled Controller.

The Enabled Controller Mini is available in 2 software versions. The USB version emulates a keyboard or a mouse. The Joystick version emulates a gamepad.  Both versions use the same hardware. It is possible to change software versions using a computer and a moderately involved process.

Usage

  1. Connect one to four assistive switches to the appropriate input ports. The switch input ports are labeled  A, B, C, D.
  2. Connect analog joystick to the desired joystick input port. The joystick input port is labelled Analog.
  3. Connect a micro USB cable to the USB C port on the Enabled Controller Mini.
  4. Connect the USB cable to the host device (e.g. computer, tablet).
  5. Activation of the switches or movement of the joystick will result in different actions depending on the software version and operating mode.

USB Version

The USB version emulates a keyboard or a mouse. Refer to the Enabled Controller Mini USB User Manual for more details.

The USB version offers the following four modes:
1) Keyboard switch

When a connected switch is activated, the device transmits a customizable keystroke.

2) Keyboard Morse Code

Two connected switches are used to input Morse code dots and dashes. Theses dots and dashes are converted to characters and transmitted as keystrokes.

3) Mouse Morse Code

Two connected switches are used to input Morse code dots and dashes. These dots and dashes are converted to and transmitted as mouse commands.

4) Settings

( Used to change reaction time )

The mode is changed by performing a long press on a switch connected to input D.

Joystick Version

The Joystick version of the software turns the Enabled Controller Mini to an adaptive gaming controller for your computer or other host device. Refer to the Enabled Controller Mini Joystick User Manual for more details.

Build Instructions

A complete set of documentation, including Bill of Materials, Assembly Guide, and User guide are available at the GitHub link.

The estimated cost of the Enabled Controller Mini is $35 CAD. The device consists of a number of off-the-shelf electronic components, a custom printed circuit board, a 3d printed enclosure, and some mechanical fasteners.

Enabled Controller

Overview

The Enabled Controller is an open-source switch interface that enables adaptive switches and analog joysticks to be used with a compatible USB device such as a computer, tablet, or phone. The switches and/or joysticks can be used to input keyboard, mouse, or joystick/gamepad commands, depending on how the device is configured. The device accepts up to 8 adaptive switches (3.5 mm) and up to two dual axis analog joysticks as inputs.

The Enabled Controller is available in 2 software versions. The USB version emulates a keyboard or a mouse. The Joystick version emulates a gamepad.  Both versions use the same hardware. It is possible to change software versions using a computer and a moderately involved process.

Usage

  1. Connect assistive switch(es) to the appropriate input port(s). The switch input ports are labeled  A, B, C, D, Left, Down, Right, Up.
  2. Connect analog joysticks to the desired joystick input ports. The joystick input ports are labelled A1 and A2.
  3. Connect a micro USB cable to the USB port on the Enabled Controller.
  4. Connect the USB cable to the host device (e.g. computer, tablet).
  5. Activation of the switches or movement of the joysticks will result in different actions depending on the software version and operating mode.

USB Version

The USB version emulates a keyboard or a mouse. Refer to the Enabled Controller USB User Manual for more details.

The USB version offers the following four modes:
1) Keyboard switch

When a connected switch is activated, the device transmits a customizable keystroke.

2) Keyboard Morse Code

Two connected switches are used to input Morse code dots and dashes. Theses dots and dashes are converted to characters and transmitted as keystrokes.

3) Mouse Morse Code

Two connected switches are used to input Morse code dots and dashes. These dots and dashes are converted to and transmitted as mouse commands.

4) Settings

( Used to change reaction time )

The mode is changed by performing a long press on a switch connected to input D.

Joystick Version

The Joystick version of the software turns the Enabled Controller to an adaptive gaming controller for your computer or other host device. Refer to the Enabled Controller Joystick User Manual for more details.

Build Instructions

A complete set of documentation, including Bill of Materials, Assembly Guide, and User guide are available at the GitHub link.

The estimated cost of the Enabled Controller is $55 CAD. The device consists of a number of off-the-shelf electronic components, a custom printed circuit board, a 3d printed enclosure, and some mechanical fasteners.