Gaming

Button Toppers for Joy-Con

Overview

The Button Toppers for Joy-Con are a set of toppers that attach to the buttons on the Nintendo Joy-Con controller of a Nintendo Switch. They make the buttons larger and further apart to make them easier to use.

Usage

To use the button toppers, they need to be glued onto the existing buttons on the Joy-Con. This is permanent, and risks damaging the Joy-Con buttons if the toppers are removed.

Once they are attached, the buttons can be used as normal.

Cost

<$1

Build Instructions

To use the button toppers, they need to be glued onto the buttons on the Joy-Con. This is permanent, and risks damaging the Joy-Con buttons if the toppers are removed.

Skills Required

  • 3D printing

Time Required

  • 3D Printing: 24 minutes
  • Assembly: 5 minutes

Tools

  • 3D printer
  • Hobby knife
  • Safety goggles

Components

  • 1X Switch button topper – A
  • 1X Switch button topper – B
  • 1X Switch button topper – X
  • 1X Switch button topper – Y OR 1X Switch button topper – Y – smaller
  • 1X Switch button topper

Attribution

FreedomWing Joystick Adapter

Overview

The FreedomWing Joystick Adapter provides a way to connect a powerchair joystick to a gaming system. This can enable someone to game with the same joystick they use to control their powerchair. This adapter is compatible with joysticks that attach to the powerchair via a DB9 connector.

The FreedomWing was designed by ATMakers in collaboration with The AbleGamers Charity and GRA-V Robotics. Makers Making Change updated the design of the PCB and created a basic set of documentation for FreedomWing 1.1.

More information available at ATMakers website: http://atmakers.org/featherwing

Usage

  1. Disable wheelchair motors.
  2. Disconnect the joystick DB9 connector from wheelchair.
  3. Connect the joystick DB9 connector to the FreedomWing Adapter Input.
  4. Connect the FreedomWing Adapter USB cable to the host device. (Use a suitable adapter if necessary.)

Cost

The approximate cost of materials to make a single FreedomWing Joystick Adapter is $75.

Build Instructions

As Open Source Hardware, all of the code and files necessary to construct the device are available for free at the linked repository. Refer to the Bill of Materials, 3D Printing Guide, and Assembly Guide.

SKILLS REQUIRED

  • 3D Printing
  • Custom PCB
  • Soldering

TIME REQUIRED

  • 3D Printing Time: 2h30m
  • Assembly Time: 1h

TOOLS

  • 3D Printer
  • Soldering Iron
  • Small screwdriver
  • Side Cutters

3D PRINTING

This design utilizes a 3D printed enclosure. The enclosure consists of a total of four parts, with a print time of approximately 2h30m.

CUSTOM PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD (PCB)

This design utilizes a custom printed circuit board (PCB). These may be obtained in small quantities (typically 5) from custom PCB manufacturers.

 

Attribution

The FreedomWing was designed by ATMakers in collaboration with The AbleGamers Charity and GRA-V Robotics.

Makers Making Change updated the design of the PCB and created a basic set of documentation for FreedomWing 1.1.

Multi Row Playing Cards Holder

Overview

The Multi Row Playing Cards Holder is an assistive device for holding playing cards. This fully 3D-printed device aims to assist those with limited hand dexterity by giving them an alternate means of holding their playing cards. Users will be able to place their cards into the tabletop holder which will discreetly display their cards during gameplay.

A Single Row Playing Cards Holder version is also available. This other device consists of a single card slot for holding approximately 20 standard sized playing cards. This device may be more suitable for users that find the single row more assessable.

 

Original device listing on printables.com

Usage

This device is intended to be used with standard sized playing cards . Larger cards can be used but will decrease the maximum number of cards that can be held. Approximately 52 cards can be placed among its four rows to be displayed.

Cost

Approximately $1.60 CAD for filament.

Build Instructions

The Multi Row Playing Cards Holder consists of a single 3D printed component. Refer to the Maker Guide and 3D Print guide for detailed instructions. No Assembly required.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D Printing Time: 10h 26m
  • Assembly Time: None

3D Printing

  • 1X Multi-Row Playing Cards Holder

Attribution

Design: Dave Jones licensed under Creative Commons (International License) Public Domain.

Documentation: Neil Squire / Makers Making Change

Grips for Joy-Con – Double

Overview

The Grip for Double Joy-Cons is a grip that holds both Joy-Cons in a more comfortable angle than the Joy-Con grip that comes with the Switch.

Usage

To use, slide both Joy-Cons into the slots on the side of the 3D printed part.

Cost

<$1.00

Build Instructions

Slide both Joy-Cons into the slots on the side of the 3D printed part

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D Printing time: 4h 17min
  • Assembly time:  <5min

Tools

  • Eye protection
  • Hobby knife
  • Sandpaper

Components

  • 1X 3D Printed Nintendo_Switch_Joy-con_Grip

3D Printing

All prints printed in default stl orientation, without supports and a 0.2mm layer height. All parts printed in PLA filament.

Attribution

Design: manabun on Thingiverse.com

Documentation: Neil Squire / Makers Making Change

Grips for Joy-Con – Single

Overview

These 3D printed devices attach to Nintendo Joy-Cons to make them easier to hold and use in the single Joy-Con configuration.

Usage

After assembling the device, the Joy-Cons can be held and used similarly to a standard game controller.

Cost

~$3.00 for filament

Build Instructions

To use this device, insert the buttons onto the grip, and then slide in the corresponding Joy-Con.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D Printing: 16h 44min
  • Assembly: 10 min

Tools

  • 3D Printer
  • Sandpaper
  • Hobby Knife

Components

  • Grip Button
  • Grip –
  • Grip +

3D Printing

All prints printed in default stl orientation, with supports and a 0.2mm layer height. All parts printed in PLA filament.

Attribution

Design: manabun on Thingiverse.com

Documentation: Neil Squire / Makers Making Change

Trigger Extender for Joy-Con Controller

Overview

This 3D printed device attaches to the Nintendo Joy-Con Grip and extends the trigger and bumper buttons users to use the buttons more easily. The extenders allow for the bumper and trigger buttons to be activate from more positions.

Usage

After assembling the device, the extenders can be pressed anywhere along their front to activate their respective button.

Cost

~$0.50 for filament

Build Instructions

To use this device, attach the central Slide-On Trigger Attachment to the centre of the Joy-Con Grip. Next insert the Joy-Cons to the Grip, then insert the trigger extenders in the lower clip and the bumper extenders in the upper clip.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • Printing time: 3h 1min
  • Assembly time: <5min

Tools

  • 3D Printer

Components

  • Slide-on Trigger Attachment
  • Shoulder Trigger Extender
  • Shoulder Bumper Extender

3D Printing

All components can be printed with no support at 20% infill with a 0.2 layer height. All pieces can be printed using PLA filament.

Attribution

Design: Sacha Potvin in the GRRIT Program of the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital

Logo of Glenrose Rehabilitation Research Innovation & Technology

Documentation: Neil Squire / Makers Making Change

One-Handed Adaptation for the Xbox Series X|S Controller

Overview

This inexpensive 3D printed modification for the Xbox Series X|S controller will allow for the user to operate their Xbox Series X|S controller with one hand. This controller adaptation makes it easier for someone who may have a difficult time holding a controller with both hands, or has greater dexterity with one hand than the other.

Compatibility

Note that the Xbox controllers can be used on PC based gaming, and can be used with a Nintendo Switch with the correct adapter.

Platforms: Xbox Series X|S, Xbox One, PC, Nintendo Switch (with an adapter such as the one linked here).

Controllers: Xbox Series X|S Controllers

Usage

This controller adaptation allows for the user to operate their Xbox Series X|S controller with only one hand.   For a left handed controller, the right joystick is used by moving the whole controller.   By moving the controller, the 3D printed parts enable the joystick to move simultaneously. In addition, the right shoulder buttons are migrated to the left side so all four shoulder buttons can be used with the index finger. Similarly, four 3D printed arms are used to allow the user to press the A, B, X, Y, and home buttons from the left side.

There are two different attachments for the bottom of the controller shown below that can be used depending on whether the user chooses to strap the controller to their leg (right),  or can rest it on their lap or a surface of their choice using the “shoe” (left).

Build Instructions

A set of instructions for assembling this modification for the Xbox Series X|S controller can be found on the Prusa Printers website and is linked above.

The Xbox Series X|S controller is asymmetrical, so this controller modification has different files for the left and right handed modifications.

SKILLS REQUIRED

  • 3D printing

TOOLS

  • 3D printer
  • Scissors

Optional:

  • Rubber bands can be added to the bottom piece of the controller (shoe) to increase grip strength
  • Raw filament can be cut and used as pin joints between some of the pieces
  • Sandpaper

3D PRINTING

All components can be printed with no support at 20% infill with a 0.2 layer height. All pieces can be printed using PLA filament. If possible, it is recommended to print the “shoe” piece in TPU, but if printed in PLA add rubber bands around the piece for additional grip. 3D print files can be found on the Prusa Printers’ website, and are linked above.

Note that all necessary components for the left and right handed modifications (including the leg mount) are included in their respective print files.

Optional files:

  • 1x Shoe (optional replacement to leg mount)
  • 1x Button Decorations (optional and only for the left handed modification)

Attribution

Designed by: Akaki

Left handed design remixed by: Ryan Hietanen

In partnership with The Controller Project

Analog Thumbstick

Overview

This is a cost-effective analog thumbstick intended to be used for adapted gaming with the Xbox Adaptive Controller (XAC). This device is a more affordable option to commercial thumbsticks on the market. This thumbstick is easy to use and gets plugged into the jacks in the back of the XAC. The design is based on a traditional PS2 thumbstick that is mounted into a 3D printed housing. The original plastic joystick topper can be swapped out for a 3D printed “U” shaped topper to make it easier to use.

Usage

The Analog Thumbstick is connected to the XAC by plugging the TRRS plug into the “X1 ” or ” X2″ jack on the back of the controller. If so equipped, the optional “push button” feature is connected by plugging into the is enabled on the thumbstick, a second mono jack will be plugged into the “L” or “R” mono jack that look like joystick icons. The joystick can also be used with the “U” shaped topper. This may be beneficial to someone who may not have the dexterity to use a smaller joystick, or someone who may have limited sensation in their fingers but still has enough wrist movement to use a joystick.

Compatibility

This thumbstick is compatible with the Xbox Adaptive controller. The XAC can be used with an Xbox Series X|S or Xbox One, Windows PC, iOS devices, Android mobile devices, as well as other gaming consoles with an appropriate adapter.

Cost

The thumbstick costs approximately $30 to build. Note, the device can be built for cheaper if more than one is ordered as several of the parts for this device come in larger quantities than needed for one device.

Build Instructions

A set of build instructions can be found in the assembly guide that is linked above.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing
  • Mechanics

Time Required

3D Printing Time:

  • Joystick Housing: 2:47
  • U-shaped Topper: 4:22

Assembly Time: 10 minutes

Tools

  • Small Flat Headed Screwdriver
  • Tape

Components

  • 1x Joystick
  • 16x Dupont Wires
  • 2x Headphone Plugs – only one is needed if the “push button” feature of the joystick is not requested.
  • 8x #4 1/2″ screws

3D Printing

  • Joystick Top
  • Joystick Base

All components can be printed with no support at 20% infill with a 0.2mm layer height. 3D print files are linked above.

Attribution

3D printed joystick housing designed by Kerilyn Kennedy – Makers Making Change, inspired by Ron Nelson’s Slider enclosure.

Documentation created by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change.

Camera Mount Adapter for Logitech Adaptive Gaming – Variable Trigger Button

Overview

This is a device for mounting a single Variable Trigger Button from the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit. To mount all the switches in the kit, or another single switch from this kit, visit this page.

The Camera Mount Adapter for Logitech Adaptive Gaming – Variable Trigger Button is an inexpensive, easy, and quick to build adapter for the variable trigger button in the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit. These adapters allow the buttons to be mounted on standard camera mounting equipment using the standard camera mount threads (¼”-20 UNC). This adapter was originally designed by ATMakers and more information on their switch mounts is available here.

Camera Mounting Options:

Some possible mounting options using these camera mount adapters are tripods, flexible “gooseneck” mounts or a magic arm as shown below:

Logitech Trigger Button with adapter and magic arm stand.

Cost

The total cost of this device includes the cost of the PLA filament used to print the device, the T-Nut used to provide threads, and the two screws used to attach the device to the appropriate Logitech Button.

The total cost of this mount comes to approximately $2.26

A 1/4″ washer and a ¼” – 20 screw (at least ½” length) are temporarily needed to install the T-Nut. If needed to purchase, this will increase the cost of the device to approximately $2.

A more complete Bill of Materials is provided in the BOM spreadsheet in the linked GitHub repository.

Build Instructions

This device consists of a single 3D-Printed part, two screws and one T-Nut. The necessary files and instructions for 3D printing as well as the assembly guide are in the linked GitHub Repository.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D printing ~1 hours
  • Assembly ~10 minutes

Tools

  • 3D Printer
  • Screwdriver
  • ¼”-20 machine screw (at least ½” length) and washer for assembly.

Components

  • 3D-Printed housing.
  • ¼”-20 Barbed T-Nut 5/16” barrel length.
  • 2x M3 x 8mm machine screws.

3D Printing

Refer to the 3D Printing Guide available in the Linked GitHub Repository.

Attribution

Original Design created by ATMakers under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license.

Documentation, modified design, design files and build files created by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.

Camera Mount Adapter for Logitech Adaptive Gaming – Light Touch Button

Overview

This is a device for mounting a single Light Touch Button from the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit. To mount all the switches in the kit, or another single switch from this kit, visit this page.

The Camera Mount Adapter for Logitech Adaptive Gaming – Light Touch Button is an inexpensive, easy, and quick to build adapter for the light touch button in the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit. These adapters allow the buttons to be mounted on standard camera mounting equipment using the standard camera mount threads (¼”-20 UNC). This adapter was originally designed by ATMakers and more information on their switch mounts is available here.

Camera Mounting Options:

Some possible mounting options using these camera mount adapters are tripods, flexible “gooseneck” mounts or a magic arm as shown below:

Light touch button on Magic Arm.

Cost

The total cost of this device includes the cost of the PLA filament used to print the device, the T-Nut used to provide threads, and the two screws used to attach the device to the appropriate Logitech Button.

The total cost of this mount comes to approximately $2.26

A 1/4″ washer and a ¼” – 20 screw (at least ½” length) are temporarily needed to install the T-Nut. If needed to purchase, this will increase the cost of the device to approximately $2.

A more complete Bill of Materials is provided in the BOM spreadsheet in the linked GitHub repository.

Build Instructions

This device consists of a single 3D-Printed part, two screws and one T-Nut. The necessary files and instructions for 3D printing as well as the assembly guide are in the linked GitHub Repository.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D printing ~1 hours
  • Assembly ~10 minutes

Tools

  • 3D Printer
  • Screwdriver
  • ¼”-20 machine screw (at least ½” length) and washer for assembly.

Components

  • 3D-Printed housing.
  • ¼”-20 Barbed T-Nut 5/16” barrel length.
  • 2x M3 x 8mm machine screws.

3D Printing

Refer to the 3D Printing Guide available in the Linked GitHub Repository.

Attribution

Original Design created by ATMakers under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license.

Documentation, modified design, design files and build files created by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.