3D Printing

Switch Adapted Nerf Gun

Overview

The Switch Adapted Nerf Gun is designed to be a switch adapted toy for an older audience. The majority of switch adapted toys are designed for a younger audience, so this project aims to adapt a toy aimed at older children and make it switch accessible.

Usage

To set up the Nerf gun on a flat surface, take the Desk stand and slide it onto the top attachment rail. This will allow the gun to stand by itself upside down.

To set up the Nerf gun on a ¼-20 bolt system, take the bolt stand and attach it to the section of the gun above the trigger as seen in the assembly guide. This will allow the gun to be attached to any ¼-20 mount system.

To use the gun, a 3.5mm switch can be plugged into the jack, and a secondary user can flick the toggle switch to activate the flywheel motors. Once the motors are spinning, the switch can be pressed and held to activate the feed motor for as long as the button is held.

Cost

~$95

Build Instructions

The build involves opening the nerf gun to modify two switches that will allow the gun to be fired with a 3.5mm mono switch.

Time Required

8h38min

1h30min

Tools

Soldering Iron

Screwdriver

Wire Strippers

Drill with 1/4inch drill bit

Components

  • Nerf Hyperfire Elite
  • D-Cell Batteries
  • ¼ -20 T-Slot Nut
  • ¼-20 Bolts

3D Printing

  • Desk Stand
  • Bolt Stand

Attribution

Jar Lid Opener

Overview

This device is intended for users who have difficulty removing the seal on a canned jar. This works for both mason jars as well as one piece lids.

Usage

To use the device, place the bump on the end on the lid of the jar, and place the hook under the edge of the lid. Lever the handle of the device upwards and the lid will come off.

Cost

<$5

Build Instructions

After printing the STL file, remove all supports, and sand any rough edges.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D printing time: 4h 20min

Tools

  • 3D Printer
  • Sandpaper
  • Flush Cut Trimmers

Components

  • 1X Jar Lid Opener

Attribution

Design by Dylan Wieczerzak

Documentation by Neil Squire Society/Makers Making Change

Assistive Scoop

Overview

The Assistive Scoop is a device designed to assist users in picking up objects off of the floor. This device is designed to assist individuals with spinal cord injuries. The handle of this device is a modified version of Makers Making Change’s Palm Pen Holder.

Usage

To use the device, the end-user places their hand into the handle and gently grips the handle.

Build Instructions

Building the Assistive Scoop requires no assembly with the main portion being 3D printed. Once the device has been 3D printed the device is ready for use.

Bill of Materials

  • 1 x 3D print bottle opener device

Print Instructions

Print the STL file at 0.2mm layer height, 20% infill, with no supports needed, printed in PLA

Attribution

This design was created by the team members of team Inspirational Kids, Nate, Cole, Caleb as part of the Make:Able Challenge.

Button Toppers for Joy-Con

Overview

The Button Toppers for Joy-Con are a set of toppers that attach to the buttons on the Nintendo Joy-Con controller of a Nintendo Switch. They make the buttons larger and further apart to make them easier to use.

Usage

To use the button toppers, they need to be glued onto the existing buttons on the Joy-Con. This is permanent, and risks damaging the Joy-Con buttons if the toppers are removed.

Once they are attached, the buttons can be used as normal.

Cost

<$1

Build Instructions

To use the button toppers, they need to be glued onto the buttons on the Joy-Con. This is permanent, and risks damaging the Joy-Con buttons if the toppers are removed.

Skills Required

  • 3D printing

Time Required

  • 3D Printing: 24 minutes
  • Assembly: 5 minutes

Tools

  • 3D printer
  • Hobby knife
  • Safety goggles

Components

  • 1X Switch button topper – A
  • 1X Switch button topper – B
  • 1X Switch button topper – X
  • 1X Switch button topper – Y OR 1X Switch button topper – Y – smaller
  • 1X Switch button topper

Attribution

FreedomWing Joystick Adapter

Overview

The FreedomWing Joystick Adapter provides a way to connect a powerchair joystick to a gaming system. This can enable someone to game with the same joystick they use to control their powerchair. This adapter is compatible with joysticks that attach to the powerchair via a DB9 connector.

The FreedomWing was designed by ATMakers in collaboration with The AbleGamers Charity and GRA-V Robotics. Makers Making Change updated the design of the PCB and created a basic set of documentation for FreedomWing 1.1.

More information available at ATMakers website: http://atmakers.org/featherwing

Usage

  1. Disable wheelchair motors.
  2. Disconnect the joystick DB9 connector from wheelchair.
  3. Connect the joystick DB9 connector to the FreedomWing Adapter Input.
  4. Connect the FreedomWing Adapter USB cable to the host device. (Use a suitable adapter if necessary.)

Cost

The approximate cost of materials to make a single FreedomWing Joystick Adapter is $75.

Build Instructions

As Open Source Hardware, all of the code and files necessary to construct the device are available for free at the linked repository. Refer to the Bill of Materials, 3D Printing Guide, and Assembly Guide.

SKILLS REQUIRED

  • 3D Printing
  • Custom PCB
  • Soldering

TIME REQUIRED

  • 3D Printing Time: 2h30m
  • Assembly Time: 1h

TOOLS

  • 3D Printer
  • Soldering Iron
  • Small screwdriver
  • Side Cutters

3D PRINTING

This design utilizes a 3D printed enclosure. The enclosure consists of a total of four parts, with a print time of approximately 2h30m.

CUSTOM PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD (PCB)

This design utilizes a custom printed circuit board (PCB). These may be obtained in small quantities (typically 5) from custom PCB manufacturers.

 

Attribution

The FreedomWing was designed by ATMakers in collaboration with The AbleGamers Charity and GRA-V Robotics.

Makers Making Change updated the design of the PCB and created a basic set of documentation for FreedomWing 1.1.

USB Switch Tester

Overview

The USB Switch Tester is a device used to test the functionality of an assistive switch with a 3.5 mm connection. This device allows the user to determine if their assistive switch is working. This device is not able to be used as a switch interface but rather lights up the red LED light if the switch is pressed and functional. The device is able to be plugged into a powered USB port to be conveniently used without the need for batteries. This is an alternative to the Simple Switch Tester design.

This device is intended to be used by users of assistive switches or disability professionals to confirm whether an assistive switch is functional.

Usage

When an assistive switch is pressed and connected to the USB Switch tester, the LED light on the tester will light up if the assistive switch is functional. If the LED does not light up when pressed, the adaptive switch is not functioning properly.

The USB Switch Tester is intended to use the existing USB power sources or USB power adapters which are very common as the power source. USB power adapters are available in most households and can be purchased locally.

Cost

~ $30.00 CAD

Build Instructions

The USB Switch Tester requires 3D printing an external shell and soldering of electrical components on a custom PCB. All electrical components are off the shelf, with the exception of the custom PCB board.

Skills Required

  • 3D printing
  • Soldering

Time Required

  • 3D Print Time: 27 min
  • Assembly time: 1 hr

Tools

  • 3D printer
  • Soldering Iron/Solder
  • Hobby Knife

Components

3D Printing

All components can be printed with no support at 20% infill with a 0.2mm layer height. All pieces can be printed using PLA filament.

  • 1X USB Switch Tester Bottom Case
  • 1X USB Switch Tester Top Case

Custom PCB

A custom PCB is required for this design. The Gerber files can be found on GitHub for manufacturing.

Attribution

This is a Makers Making Change original design by Milad Hajihassan and Derrick Andrews.

Wearable Clap Switch

Overview

The Wearable Clap Switch is a wireless assistive switch designed for users that have difficulty using traditional pressure based switches. It consists of a hand mounted transmitter, and a receiver box. When the transmitter detects a clap motion, it sends a signal to the receiver which activates the mono jack. The receiver can be used to activate an 3.5 mm assistive device like a switch adapted toy.

The original version of this project is called the Wearable Bluetooth Controller for Switch Adapted Toys. It was released by r570sv on Instructables under a CC-BY-NC-SA license.

Usage

When a clap motion is detected by the hand-mounted transmitter, the receiver will activate the connected assistive device.

Transmitter

Attach the transmitter to the users hand or wrist using the strap.

To activate the transmitter, slide the switch on the bottom of the transmitter. The transmitter will start looking for a connection, and if a receiver is broadcasting, the two will connect. Once the two have connected, the transmitter will send a signal to the receiver whenever it detects a clap.

The sensitivity of the clap detection can be adjusted using the two buttons on the top of the case. Pressing the increase sensitivity button will cause the number of illuminated LEDs in the circle to increase. Pressing the decrease sensitivity button will cause the number of illuminated LEDs in the circle to decrease.

Receiver

Connect the assistive device to the output port on the receiver using a 3.5 mm cable.

To active the receiver, flip the toggle switch from off to on. The receiver will start looking for a connection, and if the transmitter is broadcasting, the two will connect. Once they have connected, the receiver will power a relay to activate the mono jack.

To change how long the jack stays activated, adjust the potentiometer labeled Duration. To change the cooldown between activations, adjust the potentiometer labeled Delay.

Cost

~$110

Build Instructions

The transmitter is assembled with mostly off the shelf parts, the only addition being the soldering of a power switch onto the battery line. All the shell and other mechanical components are 3D printed. For the receiver, there is medium soldering to assemble the protoboard

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing
  • Soldering

Time Required

  • 3D Print Time: 12h 8min
  • Assembly Time: 1h

Tools

  • 3D printer
  • Soldering iron
  • Hobby knife
  • Multimeter
  • Flush cutters
  • Flux

Components

  • 1X Transmitter
  • 1X Receiver

3D Printing

All components can be printed with no support at 20% infill with a 0.2mm layer height. All pieces can be printed using PLA filament Programming

Attribution

The original design of the Wearable Bluetooth Controller for Switch Adapted Toys was released by r570sv  under a CC-BY-NC-SA license.
Updated 3D Printed Receiver Design, code, and documentation by Brad Wellington / Makers Making Change.

Single Row Playing Cards Holder

Overview

The Single Row Playing Cards Holder is an assistive device for holding playing cards. This fully 3D-printed device aims to assist those with limited hand dexterity by giving them an alternate means of holding their playing cards. Users can place their cards into the tabletop holder which will discreetly display their cards during gameplay. 

A Multi Row Playing Cards Holder version is also available. This other device consists of 4 card slots for holding approximately 52 standard sized playing cards. This device may be more suitable for users that want extra room for cards and can manage multiple rows.

 

Original device listing on printables.com

Usage

This device is intended to be used with standard sized playing cards. Larger cards can be used but will decrease the maximum number of cards that can be held. Approximately 20 cards placed in the holding slot to be displayed.

Cost

Approximately $0.88 CAD for filament.

Build Instructions

The Single Row Playing Cards Holder consists of a single 3D printed component. Refer to the 3D Print guide for detailed instructions. No assembly required.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D Printing Time: 5h 41m
  • Assembly Time: None

3D Printing

  • 1X Single-Row Playing Cards Holder

Attribution

Design: Shane Kartz licensed under Creative Commons (International License) Public Domain.

Documentation: Neil Squire / Makers Making Change

Multi Row Playing Cards Holder

Overview

The Multi Row Playing Cards Holder is an assistive device for holding playing cards. This fully 3D-printed device aims to assist those with limited hand dexterity by giving them an alternate means of holding their playing cards. Users will be able to place their cards into the tabletop holder which will discreetly display their cards during gameplay.

A Single Row Playing Cards Holder version is also available. This other device consists of a single card slot for holding approximately 20 standard sized playing cards. This device may be more suitable for users that find the single row more assessable.

 

Original device listing on printables.com

Usage

This device is intended to be used with standard sized playing cards . Larger cards can be used but will decrease the maximum number of cards that can be held. Approximately 52 cards can be placed among its four rows to be displayed.

Cost

Approximately $1.60 CAD for filament.

Build Instructions

The Multi Row Playing Cards Holder consists of a single 3D printed component. Refer to the Maker Guide and 3D Print guide for detailed instructions. No Assembly required.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D Printing Time: 10h 26m
  • Assembly Time: None

3D Printing

  • 1X Multi-Row Playing Cards Holder

Attribution

Design: Dave Jones licensed under Creative Commons (International License) Public Domain.

Documentation: Neil Squire / Makers Making Change

Grips for Joy-Con – Double

Overview

The Grip for Double Joy-Cons is a grip that holds both Joy-Cons in a more comfortable angle than the Joy-Con grip that comes with the Switch.

Usage

To use, slide both Joy-Cons into the slots on the side of the 3D printed part.

Cost

<$1.00

Build Instructions

Slide both Joy-Cons into the slots on the side of the 3D printed part

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D Printing time: 4h 17min
  • Assembly time:  <5min

Tools

  • Eye protection
  • Hobby knife
  • Sandpaper

Components

  • 1X 3D Printed Nintendo_Switch_Joy-con_Grip

3D Printing

All prints printed in default stl orientation, without supports and a 0.2mm layer height. All parts printed in PLA filament.

Attribution

Design: manabun on Thingiverse.com

Documentation: Neil Squire / Makers Making Change