Programming

FreedomWing Joystick Adapter

Overview

The FreedomWing Joystick Adapter provides a way to connect a powerchair joystick to a gaming system. This can enable someone to game with the same joystick they use to control their powerchair. This adapter is compatible with joysticks that attach to the powerchair via a DB9 connector.

The FreedomWing was designed by ATMakers in collaboration with The AbleGamers Charity and GRA-V Robotics. Makers Making Change updated the design of the PCB and created a basic set of documentation for FreedomWing 1.1.

More information available at ATMakers website: http://atmakers.org/featherwing

Usage

  1. Disable wheelchair motors.
  2. Disconnect the joystick DB9 connector from wheelchair.
  3. Connect the joystick DB9 connector to the FreedomWing Adapter Input.
  4. Connect the FreedomWing Adapter USB cable to the host device. (Use a suitable adapter if necessary.)

Cost

The approximate cost of materials to make a single FreedomWing Joystick Adapter is $75.

Build Instructions

As Open Source Hardware, all of the code and files necessary to construct the device are available for free at the linked repository. Refer to the Bill of Materials, 3D Printing Guide, and Assembly Guide.

SKILLS REQUIRED

  • 3D Printing
  • Custom PCB
  • Soldering

TIME REQUIRED

  • 3D Printing Time: 2h30m
  • Assembly Time: 1h

TOOLS

  • 3D Printer
  • Soldering Iron
  • Small screwdriver
  • Side Cutters

3D PRINTING

This design utilizes a 3D printed enclosure. The enclosure consists of a total of four parts, with a print time of approximately 2h30m.

CUSTOM PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD (PCB)

This design utilizes a custom printed circuit board (PCB). These may be obtained in small quantities (typically 5) from custom PCB manufacturers.

 

Attribution

The FreedomWing was designed by ATMakers in collaboration with The AbleGamers Charity and GRA-V Robotics.

Makers Making Change updated the design of the PCB and created a basic set of documentation for FreedomWing 1.1.

Wearable Clap Switch

Overview

The Wearable Clap Switch is a wireless assistive switch designed for users that have difficulty using traditional pressure based switches. It consists of a hand mounted transmitter, and a receiver box. When the transmitter detects a clap motion, it sends a signal to the receiver which activates the mono jack. The receiver can be used to activate an 3.5 mm assistive device like a switch adapted toy.

The original version of this project is called the Wearable Bluetooth Controller for Switch Adapted Toys. It was released by r570sv on Instructables under a CC-BY-NC-SA license.

Usage

When a clap motion is detected by the hand-mounted transmitter, the receiver will activate the connected assistive device.

Transmitter

Attach the transmitter to the users hand or wrist using the strap.

To activate the transmitter, slide the switch on the bottom of the transmitter. The transmitter will start looking for a connection, and if a receiver is broadcasting, the two will connect. Once the two have connected, the transmitter will send a signal to the receiver whenever it detects a clap.

The sensitivity of the clap detection can be adjusted using the two buttons on the top of the case. Pressing the increase sensitivity button will cause the number of illuminated LEDs in the circle to increase. Pressing the decrease sensitivity button will cause the number of illuminated LEDs in the circle to decrease.

Receiver

Connect the assistive device to the output port on the receiver using a 3.5 mm cable.

To active the receiver, flip the toggle switch from off to on. The receiver will start looking for a connection, and if the transmitter is broadcasting, the two will connect. Once they have connected, the receiver will power a relay to activate the mono jack.

To change how long the jack stays activated, adjust the potentiometer labeled Duration. To change the cooldown between activations, adjust the potentiometer labeled Delay.

Cost

~$110

Build Instructions

The transmitter is assembled with mostly off the shelf parts, the only addition being the soldering of a power switch onto the battery line. All the shell and other mechanical components are 3D printed. For the receiver, there is medium soldering to assemble the protoboard

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing
  • Soldering

Time Required

  • 3D Print Time: 12h 8min
  • Assembly Time: 1h

Tools

  • 3D printer
  • Soldering iron
  • Hobby knife
  • Multimeter
  • Flush cutters
  • Flux

Components

  • 1X Transmitter
  • 1X Receiver

3D Printing

All components can be printed with no support at 20% infill with a 0.2mm layer height. All pieces can be printed using PLA filament Programming

Attribution

The original design of the Wearable Bluetooth Controller for Switch Adapted Toys was released by r570sv  under a CC-BY-NC-SA license.
Updated 3D Printed Receiver Design, code, and documentation by Brad Wellington / Makers Making Change.