Soldering

Switch Adapted Nerf Gun

Overview

The Switch Adapted Nerf Gun is designed to be a switch adapted toy for an older audience. The majority of switch adapted toys are designed for a younger audience, so this project aims to adapt a toy aimed at older children and make it switch accessible.

Usage

To set up the Nerf gun on a flat surface, take the Desk stand and slide it onto the top attachment rail. This will allow the gun to stand by itself upside down.

To set up the Nerf gun on a ¼-20 bolt system, take the bolt stand and attach it to the section of the gun above the trigger as seen in the assembly guide. This will allow the gun to be attached to any ¼-20 mount system.

To use the gun, a 3.5mm switch can be plugged into the jack, and a secondary user can flick the toggle switch to activate the flywheel motors. Once the motors are spinning, the switch can be pressed and held to activate the feed motor for as long as the button is held.

Cost

~$95

Build Instructions

The build involves opening the nerf gun to modify two switches that will allow the gun to be fired with a 3.5mm mono switch.

Time Required

8h38min

1h30min

Tools

Soldering Iron

Screwdriver

Wire Strippers

Drill with 1/4inch drill bit

Components

  • Nerf Hyperfire Elite
  • D-Cell Batteries
  • ¼ -20 T-Slot Nut
  • ¼-20 Bolts

3D Printing

  • Desk Stand
  • Bolt Stand

Attribution

FreedomWing Joystick Adapter

Overview

The FreedomWing Joystick Adapter provides a way to connect a powerchair joystick to a gaming system. This can enable someone to game with the same joystick they use to control their powerchair. This adapter is compatible with joysticks that attach to the powerchair via a DB9 connector.

The FreedomWing was designed by ATMakers in collaboration with The AbleGamers Charity and GRA-V Robotics. Makers Making Change updated the design of the PCB and created a basic set of documentation for FreedomWing 1.1.

More information available at ATMakers website: http://atmakers.org/featherwing

Usage

  1. Disable wheelchair motors.
  2. Disconnect the joystick DB9 connector from wheelchair.
  3. Connect the joystick DB9 connector to the FreedomWing Adapter Input.
  4. Connect the FreedomWing Adapter USB cable to the host device. (Use a suitable adapter if necessary.)

Cost

The approximate cost of materials to make a single FreedomWing Joystick Adapter is $75.

Build Instructions

As Open Source Hardware, all of the code and files necessary to construct the device are available for free at the linked repository. Refer to the Bill of Materials, 3D Printing Guide, and Assembly Guide.

SKILLS REQUIRED

  • 3D Printing
  • Custom PCB
  • Soldering

TIME REQUIRED

  • 3D Printing Time: 2h30m
  • Assembly Time: 1h

TOOLS

  • 3D Printer
  • Soldering Iron
  • Small screwdriver
  • Side Cutters

3D PRINTING

This design utilizes a 3D printed enclosure. The enclosure consists of a total of four parts, with a print time of approximately 2h30m.

CUSTOM PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD (PCB)

This design utilizes a custom printed circuit board (PCB). These may be obtained in small quantities (typically 5) from custom PCB manufacturers.

 

Attribution

The FreedomWing was designed by ATMakers in collaboration with The AbleGamers Charity and GRA-V Robotics.

Makers Making Change updated the design of the PCB and created a basic set of documentation for FreedomWing 1.1.

Wearable Clap Switch

Overview

The Wearable Clap Switch is a wireless assistive switch designed for users that have difficulty using traditional pressure based switches. It consists of a hand mounted transmitter, and a receiver box. When the transmitter detects a clap motion, it sends a signal to the receiver which activates the mono jack. The receiver can be used to activate an 3.5 mm assistive device like a switch adapted toy.

The original version of this project is called the Wearable Bluetooth Controller for Switch Adapted Toys. It was released by r570sv on Instructables under a CC-BY-NC-SA license.

Usage

When a clap motion is detected by the hand-mounted transmitter, the receiver will activate the connected assistive device.

Transmitter

Attach the transmitter to the users hand or wrist using the strap.

To activate the transmitter, slide the switch on the bottom of the transmitter. The transmitter will start looking for a connection, and if a receiver is broadcasting, the two will connect. Once the two have connected, the transmitter will send a signal to the receiver whenever it detects a clap.

The sensitivity of the clap detection can be adjusted using the two buttons on the top of the case. Pressing the increase sensitivity button will cause the number of illuminated LEDs in the circle to increase. Pressing the decrease sensitivity button will cause the number of illuminated LEDs in the circle to decrease.

Receiver

Connect the assistive device to the output port on the receiver using a 3.5 mm cable.

To active the receiver, flip the toggle switch from off to on. The receiver will start looking for a connection, and if the transmitter is broadcasting, the two will connect. Once they have connected, the receiver will power a relay to activate the mono jack.

To change how long the jack stays activated, adjust the potentiometer labeled Duration. To change the cooldown between activations, adjust the potentiometer labeled Delay.

Cost

~$110

Build Instructions

The transmitter is assembled with mostly off the shelf parts, the only addition being the soldering of a power switch onto the battery line. All the shell and other mechanical components are 3D printed. For the receiver, there is medium soldering to assemble the protoboard

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing
  • Soldering

Time Required

  • 3D Print Time: 12h 8min
  • Assembly Time: 1h

Tools

  • 3D printer
  • Soldering iron
  • Hobby knife
  • Multimeter
  • Flush cutters
  • Flux

Components

  • 1X Transmitter
  • 1X Receiver

3D Printing

All components can be printed with no support at 20% infill with a 0.2mm layer height. All pieces can be printed using PLA filament Programming

Attribution

The original design of the Wearable Bluetooth Controller for Switch Adapted Toys was released by r570sv  under a CC-BY-NC-SA license.
Updated 3D Printed Receiver Design, code, and documentation by Brad Wellington / Makers Making Change.

Switch Adapted Peppa Pig Toy

Overview

The Switch Adapted Peppa Pig toy is an adapted “Peppa Pig Oink-Along Songs Singing Plush Doll” that can be used with a 3.5 mm assistive switch. This adaptation is intended for users that have difficulty activating the button inside the Peppa Pig toy.

Usage

Plug in an assistive switch to the cable that comes out of the back of the Peppa Pig toy (circled in blue). Then to use the toy, activate the switch, and the toy will respond as if you have pressed the button inside. Peppa will make noises each time the user activates the switch. and these will cycle through a few different noises/songs.

Cost

The total cost for this switch adapted toy is around $28 CAD. A more detailed breakdown of the costs is in the Bill of Materials.

Build Instructions

The necessary files and information required to switch adapt the toy are available in the linked GitHub repository. The build consists of a commercially available toy and some electronic components. Refer to the file Peppa_Pig_Assembly_Guide.

Skills Required

  • Soldering

Time Required

Assembly: ~1 hour

Tools

  • Drill with 1/8” bit
  • Small flat head or Phillips screwdriver
  • Flush cutters
  • Wire strippers
  • Soldering iron and solder

Components

Refer to the Bill of Materials for more information.

3D Printing

This design does not have any 3D-printed components.

Programming

This design does not require any programming.

 

Attribution

The method and documentation were developed by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change.

Switch Adapted Remote Controlled Cartoon Car

Overview

This colourful cartoon remote controlled car has been switch adapted so it can be controlled with two 3.5 mm assistive switches. This adaptation is intended for users that have difficulty activating the small buttons on the remote.

Usage

To use, plug in two assistive switches to the two mono jacks on the back of the remote. When the assistive switch is activated, it will act like the buttons on the remote. The left mono jack (when looking from the front) will act like the left button and will move the car forwards. The right mono jack (when looking from the front) will act like the right button and will move the car backwards and turn.

Back of a remote for a remote controlled car. There are two assistive switches plugged into it, and there are blue arrows showing that the left switch is for the reverse and turn motion and the right switch is for the forwards motion.

Cost

The total cost of this switch adapted remote-controlled car is around $30.35 CAD plus tax. A more detailed breakdown is in the Bill of Materials.

Build Instructions

The necessary files and information required to switch adapt the toy switch are available in the linked GitHub repository. The build consists of a commercially available toy and some electronic components. Refer to the file RC_Car_Assembly_Guide.

Skills Required

  • Soldering

Time Required

Assembly: ~1 hour

Tools

  • Drill with ¼” bit
  • Small flat head or Phillips screwdriver
  • Flush cutters
  • Wire strippers
  • Soldering iron and solder
  • Permanent marker

Components

3D Printing

This design does not have any 3D printed components.

Programming

This design does not require any programming.

 

Attribution

The method and documentation were developed by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change.

Rocket Switch Interface

Overview

The Rocket Switch Interface is a switch interface device which enables users to operate their computer or smartphone devices using assistive switches. The Rocket Switch Interface supports up to two 3.5 mm assistive switches.

Usage

Both switches can be used as inputs when short pressed, switch 1 can be used to change the operation mode when it’s pressed and hold for 4 seconds. The device can operate in several modes:

  • Switch Mode: This mode can be used along switch control software available for Windows and Android Operating Systems. Switch 1 outputs A key and switch 2 outputs B key.
  • Switch Mac Mode: This mode can be used along switch control software available for Mac Operating Systems. Switch 1 outputs F1 key and Switch 2 outputs F2 key.
  • Mouse Mode: This mode can be used to simulate a mouse button click. Switch 1 performs left mouse click and Switch 2 performs right mouse click.
  • Settings Mode: The settings mode allows the user to adjust the reaction time between switch presses.  The minimum reaction time is 50 ms (Level 10) and maximum reaction time is 500 ms (Level 1). The default reaction time is Switch 1 decrements the reaction level by 1 level and switch 2 increments the reaction level by 1 level as well.

Cost

$45 ($15.16 Components and 3D prints; ~$30 for order of custom PCBs)

Build Instructions

The Rocket Switch Interface consists of 3D printed parts, electronic components, and custom Arduino program. The Assembly Guide is available at the GitHub repository.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing
  • Soldering
  • Custom PCB
  • Microcontroller programming

Time Required

3D Printing Time: 49 Minutes

Assembly Time: 20 Minutes

Software Setup Time: 15 Minutes

Tools

  • Soldering Iron and 60/40 electronics solder
  • Needle nose pliers
  • Side cutters
  • Medium Phillips screwdriver
  • Optional clamp or vise to align PCB’s.

Components

  • 1X Rocket Switch Interface PCB
  • 1X Adafruit Rotary Trinkey (i.e., https://www.adafruit.com/product/4964)
  • 2X SJ-43514 3.5mm Jack Stereo
  • 2X 7 kOhms 1/4W Through Hole Resistor
  • 1X Light Pipe
  • 1X M3 6MM Pan Head Machine Screw Phillip

3D Printing

  • 1X Top Case (3D)
  • 1X Bottom Case (3D)
  • 1X Assembly Jig (3D)

Custom PCB

This design utilizes a custom PCB. Five boards (minimum quantity) can be obtained for approximately $30 CAD (shipping included).

Programming

A custom Arduino code (Rocket_Switch_Interface.ino) needs to be flashed using Arduino IDE.

Design

The PCB was designed using Autodesk EAGLE, and the enclosure was designed using Autodesk Fusion 360.

Attribution

Designed by Makers Making Change

Designer:

  • Milad Hajihassan, Makers Making Change

Contributors:

  • Derrick Andrews, Makers Making Change

Wireless Assistive Switch Link

Overview

The Wireless Assistive Switch Link is a device that enables a wireless connection between an assistive switch and an output device that has a 3.5 mm jack. In addition to momentary control, the device also has the option of pre-set timed latches of 10 seconds, 1 minute, or 5 minutes. This device may be useful for someone who would benefit from a wireless connection between the switch and the output device or using the latching feature for output devices.

Usage

An assistive switch is connected to the 3.5 mm jack on the transmitter. The 3.5 mm plug on the receiver is then connected to the input of the device to be controlled. With the receiver powered on, the receiver will activate the output device when the assistive switch is activated.

The device can operate in several modes:

  • Momentary Switch: The output device will turn off about 0.5 seconds after the user stops pressing the switch.
  • Toggle Switch: Activating the assistive switch will activate the output device. The output device will remain on until the assistive switch is released, and pressed again.
  • 10 Second Latched Timer: After the assistive switch is pressed and released, the output device will remain on for 10 seconds and then turn off.
  • 1 Minute Latched Timer: After the assistive switch is pressed and released, the output device will remain on for 1 minute and then turn off.
  • 5 Minute Latched Timer: After the assistive switch is pressed and released, the output device will remain on for 5 minutes and then turn off.

The mode can be changed by pressing the Mode Button on the Receiver. See the User Guide for instructions.

Cost

This device can be built for approximately $40.

Build Instructions

This build consists of 3D printable parts and some commercial off-the-shelf hardware. Refer to the Assembly Guide, Bill of Materials, and 3D Print Guide for instructions on what parts to obtain, and how to print the parts.

Skills Required

  • Soldering
  • 3D Printing
  • Mechanics

 

Time Required

3D Printing Time: 5 hours 30 minutes

Assembly Time: < 1 hour

Tools

  • Small Phillips screwdriver
  • Soldering Iron and Solder
  • Wire Strippers

 

Components

  • Wireless Relay Remote
  • Battery holder for 3 AA batteries
  • 3 x AA batteries
  • 2x Latching Switches
  • 1x 3.5mm Male to Female Cable

 

3D Printing

Refer to the Maker Guide for 3D Printing Instructions.

Design

This device was designed in Autodesk Fusion 360. Original design files are in the repository.

Attribution

Designed by Kerilyn Kennedy – Makers Making Change

Documentation by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change

Finger Lift Switch

Overview

The Finger Lift Switch is an assistive switch that is activated by lifting a resting finger upwards. The switch activation distance is approximately 5 mm and the required operating force is 2 to 5 grams, depending on balance screw adjustment.

Usage

Connect the cable to an assistive device with a 3.5 mm input jack. The user’s lifting fingertip should be placed under the finger lift pad, resting on a lower surface or splint.

When the user raises their lifting finger, the finger lift lever will rotate and activate the switch. The switch will de-activate when the user lowers their lifting finger back to the resting surface.

Cost

The cost of components for a single switch is approximately $11 CAD. However, obtaining the minimum quantities  for a single build will bring the materials costs to $66 CAD.

 

Build Instructions

The Finger Lift Switch consists of 3D printed parts and electronic components. The Assembly Guide is available at the GitHub repository.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing
  • Soldering
  • Assembling screws

Time Required

3D Printing Time: 1hr 30m

Assembly Time: 30m

Tools

  • Soldering Iron (fine tip)
  • 60/40 rosin core electrical solder
  • Medium size Phillips screwdriver (type #1)
  • Side cutters
  • Wire strippers
  • Super glue (gel type is best)
  • Hot melt glue gun (low temp type)
  • Permanent felt marker (fine tip)
  • Needle nose pliers
  • Sturdy metal tweezers
  • Multimeter (with continuity reading capability)

 

Components

  • 1X Ball Bearing: Type MR85ZZ (8 mm OD 5 mm ID)
  • 2X 5 mm x 1 mm Magnets (Neodymium)
  • 1X Reed Switch (Glass) Contact Normally Open (N/O) Magnetic Induction Switch (2 mm × 14 mm)
  • 2X M3 x 8 mm Stainless Steel screws (Base & Base Cap screws)
  • 1X M3 x 10 mm Stainless Steel screw (Counterweight screw)
  • 1X M3 x 12 mm Stainless Steel screw (Bearing Screw)
  • 1X M3 x 16 mm Stainless Steel screw (Balance screw)
  • 5X M3 Stainless Steel Nut
  • 1X 1/4-20 (Imperial size) Nut
  • 1X 5-foot mono audio cable with 3.5 mm male phono plug

 

3D Printing

  • 1X Finger Lift Lever (3D)
  • 1X Balance Screw Holder (3D)
  • 1X Counterweight Nut Holder (3D)
  • 1X Bearing Base (3D)
  • 1X Bearing Base Cap (3D)
  • 1X Reed Switch Plate (3D)

Design

This design was created using OpenSCAD.

Attribution

Designed by Makers Making Change (Derrick Andrews) in conjunction with Sunnyhill

Switch Adapted Bubble Blower Fan

Overview

The Switch Adapted Bubble Blower Fan is a commercial toy modified for use with an assistive switch. The Switch Adapted Bubble Blower may be beneficial to someone who may have difficulty pressing the original small activation button due to its size, location, or required activation force.

Usage

Attach an assistive switch with a 3.5 mm plug to the 3.5 mm jack on the toy. When the assistive switch is activated, the toy will generate bubbles.

Cost

The toy is commercially available for about $5. A suitable jack and the necessary wire will bring the total cost to approximately $10.

Build Instructions

An installation guide is available at the linked repository.

Time Required

Assembly Time: 20-30 minutes

Tools

  • Screwdriver, Phillips, Small
  • Soldering Iron
  • De-soldering braid / Solder sucker
  • Hot Glue Gun

 

Components

  • 1X Play Day Bubble Blower Fan
  • 1X 3.5 mm Mono Panel Mount Jack
  • 2X Wire, 8 cm

 

3D Printing

This design does not have any 3D printed components.

Programming

This design does not require any programming.

 

Attribution

The method and documentation were developed by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change.

Switch Adapted Water Gun

Overview

This is a switch adapted water gun that is compatible with 3.5mm switches. This device may be beneficial to someone with limited hand function that is interested in using a water gun.

Usage

The Switch Adapted Water Gun can be used with any 3.5mm switch. If you do not own one, you can request one from our device library.

Cost

The device costs approximately $35 to adapt.

Build Instructions

A set of build instructions to adapt this toy can be found in the Assembly Guide linked above.

Skills Required

  • Mechanics
  • Soldering

Time Required

  • 3D Print Time: 3 hours 15 minutes
  • Assembly Time: Approximately 1 hour

Tools

  • Drill with ¼” bit
  • Small flat head or Phillips screwdriver (it must be skinny as the screws are in deep)
  • Flush Cutters
  • Wire Strippers
  • Soldering Iron and Solder
  • Scissors

Components

  • 1x electric water gun
  • 1x 3.5mm mono jack and nut
  • 2x wires 15cm long
  • 1x copper tape 8mm long
  • 1x zip tie
  • 1x 1cm x 1cm card stock or paper
  • 4x AA batteries
  • 1x 1/4″-20 UNC hex bolt, 1/2″ length
  • 1x 1/4″-20 UNC Tee Nut Insert

3D Printing

  • 1x Water Gun Stand

Attribution

Toy adaption by Kerilyn Kennedy – Makers Making Change

3D Printed Water Gun Stand designed by Kerilyn Kennedy – Makers Making Change

Documentation by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change