User Tested

Palm Pen Holder

There are multiple sizes available for this device for both the device size and pen hole size. If you are requesting this device, please indicate which size you believe will work the best for you. There is a printable document that can be used to give a to scale size of the device and pen hole diameter as well as a sizing guide and recommendations below.

Overview

This is a customizable (parametric) 3D printable writing aid. The Palm Pen Holder makes it easier to grip a pen, pencil, or other writing utensil and may be useful for someone who has difficulty holding a pen or pencil directly. The device is able to be slid onto the hand of the user or gripped in various positions. The multiple sizing allows for various writing utensils and hand sizes.

Usage

A pen or pencil is inserted through the Palm Pen Holder pen hole and is fixed in place by tightening a set screw to allow for different writing utensil sizes. The device can be gripped in multiple ways and also gently squeezes the hand for stability when writing. With different sizing available, this device works well with narrow writing utensils like paintbrushes or wider ones like sharpie markers. In addition, the device itself has alternate sizing to provide options for the user.

Build Instructions

All documentation, design files, and photos can be found on the GitHub page that is linked at the top of this project page. The Maker Checklist document will aid you in following the correct steps to build and work with the requestor.

SKILLS REQUIRED

  • 3D Printing

BILL OF MATERIALS

To assemble the Palm Pen Holder, you will need:
  • 1x 3D Printed Palm Pen Holder
  • 1x M4 machine screws, 20 mm long ($1.25 – $2.50) Link —or— Alternative Link
  • 1x M4 hex nuts ($0.25)  Link —or— Alternative Link
  • 1x Writing utensil (pen, pencil, etc)

TOOLS

  • Screwdriver
  • 3D printer

3D PRINTING

The design prints in ABS or PLA with no support. 3D print STL’s and instructions can be found on the GitHub page linked at the top of this project page.

CUSTOMIZATION

The design is parametric, which means that the size of the device itself the size of the pen hole can be modified by changing numbers in OpenSCAD. The editable OpenSCAD file can be found on the GitHub page linked at the top of the project page along with instructions within the documentation.

Sizing:

There are small, medium, and large-sized Palm Pen Holder available for different hand sizes. In addition, the pen hole diameter can also be changed from narrow, standard, and wide. By use of the set screw, the writing utensil does not need to be the exact size of the pen hole but rather the sizing is available to fit large writing devices like markers and narrow ones such as fine paintbrushes. Sizing Charts can be found below and in addition, downloading the to scale document will allow one to see the outline of the different sizes to determine the ideal size.

sizing of Palm Pen Holder device as well as the pen diameter

Line Drawing of Palm Pen Holder indicating the sizing locations referencing the table

Palm Pen Holder Sizing Chart:

Palm Pen Holder version Pen hole size A

(mm)

B

(mm)

C

(mm)

D

(mm)

Pen Hole

(mm)

Small Palm Pen Holder Narrow 23 21 93 25 7
Standard 23 21 93 25 13
Wide 23 21 93 25 18
Medium Palm Pen Holder Narrow 24 26 110 35 7
Standard 24 26 110 35 13
Wide 24 26 110 35 18
Large Palm Pen Holder Narrow 25 33 120 40 7
Standard 25 33 120 40 13
Wide 25 33 120 40 18

Attribution:

Design: Makers Making Change
OpenSCAD: Stewart Russell and Tyler Fentie

Switch Modifier

Overview

The switch modifier is an affordable accessibility device that enables specific switch output functions. With the provided Arduino code, the switch modifier outputs a momentary switch signal for a specific hold duration, in response to a digital input signal. Regardless of the duration of the input signal, the output can be set to any duration from 20 to 500 milliseconds. Manually turning a potentiometer allows for adjustment in output duration.

Usage

With the provided Arduino code, the intended usage is for applications that require fast, short duration switch activation, where the user’s motor control is too slow to achieve such movement. To achieve multiple switch activations, the user must release the input switch first before activating it again. Minor adjustments to the code may provide for longer output durations, or latching functionality.

Disclaimer: Construction, use and modification of this device is the responsibility of the end user. The Stan Cassidy Centre for Rehabilitation and its employees are not responsible for any damages or harm as a result of the construction or use of this device.

Build Instructions

Bill of Materials

See link below.

Tools Required

– Soldering Iron
– Screw Driver
– Wire Cutters / wire strippers
– Super Glue

3D Printing

The lid and the base are printed face up with no supports. The middle piece is printed in its intended usage orientation (lettering upright) and will require supports in the bottom battery compartment, and port holes in the walls. The original box was printed on a Raise3D N2 printer using PLA. Speed printing is approximately 7.5 hours and high quality is approximately 18.5 hours.

Assembling the Circuit

Take care in the placement of the electronics on the proto board to allow for everything to fit. Only attach the back end of the nano controller up to pins D2 and A7 (inclusive). The remaining portion of the controller will overhang and rest on the support structure. Ensure the nano controller will line up with the access port on the side wall of the 3D printed box.
Please refer to the following diagram for assembling the rest of the circuit.
Note: Do not solder the battery holder wires on until the 3D printed box is ready and the wires can be passed through the access hole.

Assembling the Box

1. Remove all 3D printed supports from the middle section of the box.
2. Feed the battery holder wires through the access hole and mount it in the bottom compartment using two M2x6 screws.
3. Mount the assembled proto board to the standoffs in the upper compartment using two M2x6 screws.
4. Solder the battery wires to the appropriate locations on the proto board. Ensure not to melt the plastic box.
5. Mount the auxiliary mono jacks in the appropriate port holes in the walls of the box.
6. Mount the ON/OFF switch in the remaining port hole in the wall of the box using super glue. Ensure not to glue the switch stuck in the ON or OFF position.
7. Attach the lid of the box using four M2x20 screws. Ensure not to over torque the screws and damage the lid. Also, ensure that no wires are pinched between the lid and the walls of the box.
8. Insert four AA batteries (not included in list of materials) into the battery holder.
9. Attach the base of the box using found M2x20 screws. Ensure not to over torque the screws and damage the base.

Arduio Code

// Created by Rachelle Bernier
// Stan Cassidy Centre for Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Engineering Department
// September 2019
// Switch Modifier

unsigned long potPin = A7; //potentionmeter input
unsigned long enterPin = 3; //digital input signal
unsigned long exitPin = 2; //digital output signal
int temp; //temporary placeholder for alaog input value from potentiometer
int holdTime; //output momentary signal duration
boolean flag = 0; //identifier to ensure user releases input before another activation can be completed
void setup() {
pinMode(potPin, INPUT);
pinMode(enterPin, INPUT_PULLUP);
pinMode(exitPin, OUTPUT);
digitalWrite(exitPin, LOW);
//Serial.begin(9600); //uncomment for testing purposes
delay(500);
}
void loop() {
// SECTION A: The following section of code sets a threshold for a momentary output signal duration givent the input from the potentiometer.
temp = analogRead(potPin);
holdTime = map(temp, 0, 920, 20, 500);

//Serial.println(holdTime); //uncomment for testing purposes
if ((digitalRead(enterPin) == LOW) && flag == 0) {
flag = 1;
digitalWrite(exitPin, HIGH);
delay(holdTime);
digitalWrite(exitPin, LOW);
}
if (digitalRead(enterPin) == HIGH)
{
flag = 0;
}
///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// SECTION B: The following section of code sets the switch modifier to latching mode. Comment out section A if you would like the modifier to be in latching mode.
// if ((digitalRead(enterPin) == LOW) && flag == 0) {
// flag = 1;
// digitalWrite(exitPin, HIGH);
// }
// if ((digitalRead(enterPin) == LOW) && flag == 1) {
// flag = 0;
// digitalWrite(exitPin, LOW);
// }
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
}

Camera Mount Adapter for Original Jelly Bean

Overview

This is an inexpensive 3d printed mounting adapter for the original (oval-shaped) AbleNet Jelly Bean switch to attach to camera-type mounts. This adapter was designed by ATMakers.

Usage

The Jelly Bean switch is connected to the mounting adapter using two screws. The mounting adapter can then be attached to a tripod or a mounting arm with a camera connection (i.e., 1/4″-20 UNC) to provide convenient switch placement.

Build Instructions

A comprehensive set of instructions for creating this style of switch mounting adapter is available at the following link: http://atmakers.org/2017/02/at-switch-adapters/

Bill of Materials

To assemble the mount with the switch, you will need:
1 – 1/4″-20 UNC tee nut, 5/16″ , 7/16″, or 9/16″ long (~$0.30, hardware store or McMaster-Carr)

1 – 3D Printed Mounting Adapter, design file to match length of tee nut (~ 10 g of filament, $0.30)

2 – #3-32 UNC x 3/4″ long Machine screws

 

You will also need the following temporarily to install the tee nut:
1 – 1/4″ Washer
1 – 1/4-20 UNC machine screw or bolt, 3/4″ – 1-1/2″ length

1- Screwdriver, drill or wrench (depending on the type of bolt chosen) to tighten the bolt.

3D Printing

The mounting adapter is designed to be printed with support. The print should be oriented so that the cylindrical portion of the tee nut is vertical, with the large oval surface on the print bed.

 

Assembling the Mounting Adapter

Clean out any support material from the center section.

To install the tee nut, line up the barbs of the tee nut with the slots on the mount adapter. Put the washer on the 1/4″-20 UNC bolt, and thread it through the adapter and into the tee nut. Tighten the bolt until the tee is flush with the bottom of the adapter. You can then unscrew and remove the bolt and washer.

This video demonstrates how to install the tee-nut: https://youtu.be/_fH-vgqx3uw?t=2235

Attaching Mount To Switch

Attach the 3d printed mounting adapter to the back side of the Jelly Bean switch using the two machine screws.

 

3 Inch AT Switch Camera Mount

Overview

This is an inexpensive 3d printed mounting adapter to attach larger commercial assistive switches to camera-type mounts designed by ATMakers. This adapter should work with the following AbleNet switches:

This mounting adapter also works with the Interact Switch from our assistive devices library.

Usage

The switch is connected to the mounting adapter using three screws. The mounting adapter can then be attached to a tripod or a mounting arm with a camera connection (i.e., 1/4″-20 UNC) to provide convenient switch placement.

Build Instructions

A comprehensive set of instructions for creating this style of switch mounting adapter is available at the following link: http://atmakers.org/2017/02/at-switch-adapters/

Bill of Materials

To assemble the mount with the switch, you will need:
1 – 1/4″-20 UNC tee nut, 5/16″ , 7/16″, or 9/16″ long (~$0.30, hardware store or McMaster-Carr)

1 – 3D Printed Mounting Adapter, design file to match length of tee nut (~ 30 g of filament, $0.90)

3 – #6-32 UNC x 3/4″ long Machine screws

 

You will also need the following temporarily to install the tee nut:
1 – 1/4″ Washer
1 – 1/4-20 UNC machine screw or bolt, 3/4″ – 1-1/2″ length

1- Screwdriver, drill or wrench (depending on the type of bolt chosen) to tighten the bolt.

3D Printing

The mounting adapter is designed to be printed with support. The print should be oriented so that the cylindrical portion of the tee nut is vertical, with the large oval surface on the print bed.

 

Assembling the Mounting Adapter

Clean out any support material from the center section.

To install the tee nut, line up the barbs of the tee nut with the slots on the mount adapter. Put the washer on the 1/4″-20 UNC bolt, and thread it through the adapter and into the tee nut. Tighten the bolt until the tee is flush with the bottom of the adapter. You can then unscrew and remove the bolt and washer.

This video demonstrates how to install the tee-nut: https://youtu.be/_fH-vgqx3uw?t=2235

Attaching Mount To Switch

Attach the 3d printed mounting adapter to the back side of the switch using the three machine screws.

Camera Mount Adapter for HoneyBee Proximity

Overview

This is an inexpensive 3d printed mounting adapter for connecting a commercially available Adaptivation Honeybee Proximity switch (https://www.adaptivation.com/product-page/honeybee) to camera-type mounts. This adapter was designed by ATMakers.

Usage

The Honeybee Proximity switch is slid inside the mounting adapter. The mounting adapter can then be attached to a tripod or a mounting arm with a camera connection (i.e., 1/4″-20 UNC) to provide convenient switch placement.

 

Build Instructions

A comprehensive set of instructions for creating this style of switch mounting adapter is available at the following link: http://atmakers.org/2017/02/at-switch-adapters/

Bill of Materials

To assemble the mount with the switch, you will need:
1 – 1/4″-20 UNC tee nut, 5/16″ , 7/16″, or 9/16″ long (~$0.30, hardware store or McMaster-Carr)

1 – 3D Printed Mounting Adapter, design file to match length of tee nut (~ 70 g of filament, $0.80)

 

You will also need the following temporarily to install the tee nut:
1 – 1/4″ Washer
1 – 1/4-20 UNC machine screw or bolt, 3/4″ – 1-1/2″ length

1- Screwdriver, drill or wrench (depending on the type of bolt chosen) to tighten the bolt.

3D Printing

The mounting adapter is designed to be printed with the in the vertical orientation with the camera mount oriented horizontally.

Assembling the Mounting Adapter

Clean out any support material from the center section.

To install the tee nut, line up the barbs of the tee nut with the slots on the mount adapter. Put the washer on the 1/4″-20 UNC bolt, and thread it through the adapter and into the tee nut. Tighten the bolt until the tee is flush with the bottom of the adapter. You can then unscrew and remove the bolt and washer.

This video demonstrates how to install the tee-nut: https://youtu.be/_fH-vgqx3uw?t=2235

Attaching Mount To Switch

Slide the Honeybee Proximity Switch into the 3d printed camera mount adapter. Friction will keep it in place.

Camera Mount Adapter for Big Switches

Overview

This is an inexpensive 3D printed mounting adapter to attach larger commercial assistive switches to camera-type mounts. The adapter was designed by ATMakers. This adapter should work with the following AbleNet switches:

Usage

The switch is connected to the mounting adapter using three screws. The mounting adapter can then be attached to a tripod or a mounting arm with a camera connection (i.e., 1/4″-20 UNC) to provide convenient switch placement.

Build Instructions

A comprehensive set of instructions for creating this style of switch mounting adapter is available at the following link: http://atmakers.org/2017/02/at-switch-adapters/

Bill of Materials

To assemble the mount with the switch, you will need:
1 – 1/4″-20 UNC tee nut, 5/16″ , 7/16″, or 9/16″ long (~$0.30, hardware store or McMaster-Carr)

1 – 3D Printed Mounting Adapter, design file to match length of tee nut (~ 70 g of filament, $2.10)

3 – #10-32 UNC x 3/4″ long machine screws

3 – #10-32 UNC Nuts (for switches with holes)

 

You will also need the following temporarily to install the tee nut:
1 – 1/4″ Washer
1 – 1/4-20 UNC machine screw or bolt, 3/4″ – 1-1/2″ length
1- Screwdriver, drill or wrench (depending on the type of bolt chosen) to tighten the bolt.

 

3D Printing

The mounting adapter is designed to be printed with support. The print should be oriented so that the cylindrical portion of the tee nut is vertical, with the large flat surface on the print bed.

 

Assembling the Mounting Adapter

Clean out any support material from the center section.

To install the tee nut, line up the barbs of the tee nut with the slots on the mount adapter. Put the washer on the 1/4″-20 UNC bolt, and thread it through the adapter and into the tee nut. Tighten the bolt until the tee is flush with the bottom of the adapter. You can then unscrew and remove the bolt and washer.

This video demonstrates how to install the tee-nut: https://youtu.be/_fH-vgqx3uw?t=2235

Attaching Mount To Switch

Attach the 3D printed mounting adapter to the back side of the assistive switch using the three machine screws.

Camera Mount Adapter for Micro Light

Overview

This is an inexpensive 3d printed mounting adapter for connecting a commercially available Micro Light Switch to camera-type mounts. This adapter was designed by ATMakers.

Usage

The Micro Light Switch is positioned inside the mounting adapter and affixed with a machine screw. The mounting adapter can then be attached to a tripod or a mounting arm with a camera connection (i.e., 1/4″-20 UNC) to provide convenient switch placement.

 

Build Instructions

A comprehensive set of instructions for creating this style of switch mounting adapter is available at the following link: http://atmakers.org/2017/02/at-switch-adapters/

Bill of Materials

To assemble the mount with the switch, you will need:
1 – 1/4″-20 UNC tee nut, 5/16″ , 7/16″, or 9/16″ long (~$0.30, hardware store or McMaster-Carr)

1 – 3D Printed Mounting Adapter, design file to match length of tee nut (~ 10 g of filament, $0.30)

1 – #4-40 machine screw, 1/4″ or 3/8″ long

 

You will also need the following temporarily to install the tee nut:
1 – 1/4″ Washer
1 – 1/4-20 UNC machine screw or bolt, 3/4″ – 1-1/2″ length

1- Screwdriver, drill or wrench (depending on the type of bolt chosen) to tighten the bolt.

3D Printing

The mounting adapter is best printed with the round flat cylindrical surface down, with supports under the switch support section.  If printing in ABS, printing two simultaneously may provide better results.

Assembling the Mounting Adapter

Clean out any support material from below the switch support section.

To install the tee nut, line up the barbs of the tee nut with the slots on the mount adapter. Put the washer on the 1/4″-20 UNC bolt, and thread it through the adapter and into the tee nut. Tighten the bolt until the tee is flush with the bottom of the adapter. You can then unscrew and remove the bolt and washer.

This video demonstrates how to install the tee-nut: https://youtu.be/_fH-vgqx3uw?t=2235

Attaching Mount To Switch

Slide the Micro Light Switch into the 3d printed camera mount adapter and use the #4-40 machine screw to fix it in place.

Camera Mount Adapter for Little Candy Corn Proximity Sensor

Overview

This is an inexpensive 3d printed mounting adapter for connecting a commercially available LITTLE Candy Corn Proximity switch to camera-type mounts. This adapter was designed by ATMakers.

Usage

The Little Candy Corn switch is screwed onto the mounting adapter. The mounting adapter can then be attached to a tripod or a mounting arm with a camera connection (i.e., 1/4″-20 UNC) to provide convenient switch placement.

 

Build Instructions

A comprehensive set of instructions for creating this style of switch mounting adapter is available at the following link: http://atmakers.org/2017/02/at-switch-adapters/

Bill of Materials

To assemble the mount with the switch, you will need:
1 – 1/4″-20 UNC tee nut, 5/16″ , 7/16″, or 9/16″ long (~$0.30, hardware store or McMaster-Carr)

1 – 3D Printed Mounting Adapter, design file to match length of tee nut (~ 10 g of filament, $0.30)

3 – #xx? flat head wood screws,

 

You will also need the following temporarily to install the tee nut:
1 – 1/4″ Washer
1 – 1/4-20 UNC machine screw or bolt, 3/4″ – 1-1/2″ length

1- Screwdriver, drill or wrench (depending on the type of bolt chosen) to tighten the bolt.

3D Printing

The mounting adapter should be printed with the flat, rounded triangular portion down. Support is required for the tee nut mounting hole.

Assembling the Mounting Adapter

Clean out any support material from the center section.

To install the tee nut, line up the barbs of the tee nut with the slots on the mount adapter. Put the washer on the 1/4″-20 UNC bolt, and thread it through the adapter and into the tee nut. Tighten the bolt until the tee is flush with the bottom of the adapter. You can then unscrew and remove the bolt and washer.

This video demonstrates how to install the tee-nut: https://youtu.be/_fH-vgqx3uw?t=2235

Attaching Mount To Switch

Rotate the rear portion of the LITTLE Candy Corn switch to expose the three mounting holes. Align the lobes to the mounting adapter to ensure that the power switch is accessible and then use the three flat head wood screws to connect the switch to the mount adapter. The switch can then be rotated into its normal position.

LipSync Macro

Overview

The LipSync Macro is a mouth operated input device that allows a person with minimal head and neck movement to control a computer or smartphone. All the electronics are housed in the ‘head’ of the device so there are no additional control boxes, making the LipSync a good candidate for portable, wheelchair-mounted applications. The mouthpiece is attached to a precision miniature joystick sensor that requires very slight pressure in order to generate keystrokes. The mouthpiece is also hollow, allowing sips and puffs to be translated into additional keystrokes.

The LipSync Macro contains a Bluetooth module for connecting to a Bluetooth compatible computer, tablet, or smartphone.

Device Compatibility

  • Phone: Android 5.0+, iOS 7+, Windows
  • Tablet: Android 5.0+, iOS 7+, Windows
  • Computer & Laptop: Windows, MacOS, Linux

LipSync Variants

There are several different versions of the LipSync:

The original LipSync emulates a USB mouse.

The LipSync Wireless emulates a wireless Bluetooth® mouse.

The LipSync Gaming emulates a USB joystick or USB gamepad. It is compatible with the Xbox Adaptive controller and any desktop or laptop.

The LipSync Macro emulates a USB keyboard. It can be used with older iOS devices to provide switch access through the accessibility features.

The LipSync Switch Input Module can be used to modify one of the above versions so that a user can use switches instead of sip and puff. This can be a useful option for those unable to form their lips around mouthpiece or apply the positive / negative pressure to generate sips and puffs.

Usage

The LipSync Macro should be mounted in a stable position near the user’s face, close enough to their mouth so they can move the mouthpiece. The LipSync Macro needs to be powered through the attached USB cable by a USB power pack, USB power adapter or by connecting to a suitable USB port. Once the LipSync Macro is paired to the device, moving the mouthpiece and applying sips and puffs to the mouthpiece will generate keystrokes. These keystrokes can be mapped to accessibility switches to provide switch access in older iOS devices that do not support a mouse cursor.

A brief start-up guide and detailed user guide are available at the GitHub link below.

Build Instructions

The latest Bill of Materials, 3D print files, and Assembly Manual are available at the GitHub link below.

Design

The original design of the LipSync was completed by the Neil Squire Society with support from Google.org.

LipSync Wireless

Overview

The LipSync Wireless is a mouth operated joystick that allows a person to control a computer cursor with minimal head and neck movement. All the electronics are housed in the ‘head’ of the device so there are no additional control boxes, making the LipSync a good candidate for portable, wheelchair-mounted applications. The mouthpiece is attached to a precision miniature joystick sensor that requires very slight pressure in order to move a cursor on the screen. The mouthpiece is also hollow, allowing sips and puffs to be translated into mouse clicks or touchscreen gestures.

Device Compatibility

  • Phone: Android 4.0+, iOS 13+*, Windows
  • Tablet: Android 4.0+, iOS 13+*, Windows
  • Computer & Laptop: Windows, MacOS, Linux

LipSync Variants

There are several different versions of the LipSync:

The original LipSync emulates a USB mouse.

The LipSync Wireless emulates a wireless Bluetooth® mouse.

The LipSync Gaming emulates a USB joystick or USB gamepad. It is compatible with the Xbox Adaptive controller and any desktop or laptop.

The LipSync Macro emulates a USB keyboard. It can be used with older iOS devices to provide switch access through the accessibility features.

The LipSync Switch Input Module can be used to modify one of the above versions so that a user can use switches instead of sip and puff. This can be a useful option for those unable to form their lips around mouthpiece or apply the positive / negative pressure to generate sips and puffs.

Usage

The LipSync Wireless needs to be mounted in a stable position near the user’s face, close enough to their mouth so they can move the mouthpiece. The LipSync Wireless needs to be powered through the attached USB cable by a USB power pack, USB power adapter or by connecting to a suitable USB port. Once the LipSync Wireless is paired to the device, moving the mouthpiece will move the cursor and applying sips and puffs to the mouthpiece will generate mouse clicks or touchscreen gestures.

The buttons on the back of the LipSync are used to control the speed of the cursor. Pressing the up button will increase the cursor speed, while pressing the down button will decrease the cursor speed. Pressing the two buttons simultaneously will start the calibration routine to calibrate the mouthpiece joystick.

A brief start-up guide and detailed user guide are available at the GitHub link below.

Build Instructions

The latest Bill of Materials, 3D print files, and detailed Assembly Manual are available at the GitHub link below.

Design

The original design of the LipSync was completed by the Neil Squire Society with support from Google.org.