Adapted Toys

Switch Adapted Nerf Gun

Overview

The Switch Adapted Nerf Gun is designed to be a switch adapted toy for an older audience. The majority of switch adapted toys are designed for a younger audience, so this project aims to adapt a toy aimed at older children and make it switch accessible.

Usage

To set up the Nerf gun on a flat surface, take the Desk stand and slide it onto the top attachment rail. This will allow the gun to stand by itself upside down.

To set up the Nerf gun on a ¼-20 bolt system, take the bolt stand and attach it to the section of the gun above the trigger as seen in the assembly guide. This will allow the gun to be attached to any ¼-20 mount system.

To use the gun, a 3.5mm switch can be plugged into the jack, and a secondary user can flick the toggle switch to activate the flywheel motors. Once the motors are spinning, the switch can be pressed and held to activate the feed motor for as long as the button is held.

Cost

~$95

Build Instructions

The build involves opening the nerf gun to modify two switches that will allow the gun to be fired with a 3.5mm mono switch.

Time Required

8h38min

1h30min

Tools

Soldering Iron

Screwdriver

Wire Strippers

Drill with 1/4inch drill bit

Components

  • Nerf Hyperfire Elite
  • D-Cell Batteries
  • ¼ -20 T-Slot Nut
  • ¼-20 Bolts

3D Printing

  • Desk Stand
  • Bolt Stand

Attribution

Switch Adapted Peppa Pig Toy

Overview

The Switch Adapted Peppa Pig toy is an adapted “Peppa Pig Oink-Along Songs Singing Plush Doll” that can be used with a 3.5 mm assistive switch. This adaptation is intended for users that have difficulty activating the button inside the Peppa Pig toy.

Usage

Plug in an assistive switch to the cable that comes out of the back of the Peppa Pig toy (circled in blue). Then to use the toy, activate the switch, and the toy will respond as if you have pressed the button inside. Peppa will make noises each time the user activates the switch. and these will cycle through a few different noises/songs.

Cost

The total cost for this switch adapted toy is around $28 CAD. A more detailed breakdown of the costs is in the Bill of Materials.

Build Instructions

The necessary files and information required to switch adapt the toy are available in the linked GitHub repository. The build consists of a commercially available toy and some electronic components. Refer to the file Peppa_Pig_Assembly_Guide.

Skills Required

  • Soldering

Time Required

Assembly: ~1 hour

Tools

  • Drill with 1/8” bit
  • Small flat head or Phillips screwdriver
  • Flush cutters
  • Wire strippers
  • Soldering iron and solder

Components

Refer to the Bill of Materials for more information.

3D Printing

This design does not have any 3D-printed components.

Programming

This design does not require any programming.

 

Attribution

The method and documentation were developed by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change.

Switch Adapted Remote Controlled Cartoon Car

Overview

This colourful cartoon remote controlled car has been switch adapted so it can be controlled with two 3.5 mm assistive switches. This adaptation is intended for users that have difficulty activating the small buttons on the remote.

Usage

To use, plug in two assistive switches to the two mono jacks on the back of the remote. When the assistive switch is activated, it will act like the buttons on the remote. The left mono jack (when looking from the front) will act like the left button and will move the car forwards. The right mono jack (when looking from the front) will act like the right button and will move the car backwards and turn.

Back of a remote for a remote controlled car. There are two assistive switches plugged into it, and there are blue arrows showing that the left switch is for the reverse and turn motion and the right switch is for the forwards motion.

Cost

The total cost of this switch adapted remote-controlled car is around $30.35 CAD plus tax. A more detailed breakdown is in the Bill of Materials.

Build Instructions

The necessary files and information required to switch adapt the toy switch are available in the linked GitHub repository. The build consists of a commercially available toy and some electronic components. Refer to the file RC_Car_Assembly_Guide.

Skills Required

  • Soldering

Time Required

Assembly: ~1 hour

Tools

  • Drill with ¼” bit
  • Small flat head or Phillips screwdriver
  • Flush cutters
  • Wire strippers
  • Soldering iron and solder
  • Permanent marker

Components

3D Printing

This design does not have any 3D printed components.

Programming

This design does not require any programming.

 

Attribution

The method and documentation were developed by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change.

Wireless Assistive Switch Link

Overview

The Wireless Assistive Switch Link is a device that enables a wireless connection between an assistive switch and an output device that has a 3.5 mm jack. In addition to momentary control, the device also has the option of pre-set timed latches of 10 seconds, 1 minute, or 5 minutes. This device may be useful for someone who would benefit from a wireless connection between the switch and the output device or using the latching feature for output devices.

Usage

An assistive switch is connected to the 3.5 mm jack on the transmitter. The 3.5 mm plug on the receiver is then connected to the input of the device to be controlled. With the receiver powered on, the receiver will activate the output device when the assistive switch is activated.

The device can operate in several modes:

  • Momentary Switch: The output device will turn off about 0.5 seconds after the user stops pressing the switch.
  • Toggle Switch: Activating the assistive switch will activate the output device. The output device will remain on until the assistive switch is released, and pressed again.
  • 10 Second Latched Timer: After the assistive switch is pressed and released, the output device will remain on for 10 seconds and then turn off.
  • 1 Minute Latched Timer: After the assistive switch is pressed and released, the output device will remain on for 1 minute and then turn off.
  • 5 Minute Latched Timer: After the assistive switch is pressed and released, the output device will remain on for 5 minutes and then turn off.

The mode can be changed by pressing the Mode Button on the Receiver. See the User Guide for instructions.

Cost

This device can be built for approximately $40.

Build Instructions

This build consists of 3D printable parts and some commercial off-the-shelf hardware. Refer to the Assembly Guide, Bill of Materials, and 3D Print Guide for instructions on what parts to obtain, and how to print the parts.

Skills Required

  • Soldering
  • 3D Printing
  • Mechanics

 

Time Required

3D Printing Time: 5 hours 30 minutes

Assembly Time: < 1 hour

Tools

  • Small Phillips screwdriver
  • Soldering Iron and Solder
  • Wire Strippers

 

Components

  • Wireless Relay Remote
  • Battery holder for 3 AA batteries
  • 3 x AA batteries
  • 2x Latching Switches
  • 1x 3.5mm Male to Female Cable

 

3D Printing

Refer to the Maker Guide for 3D Printing Instructions.

Design

This device was designed in Autodesk Fusion 360. Original design files are in the repository.

Attribution

Designed by Kerilyn Kennedy – Makers Making Change

Documentation by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change

Switch Adapted Bubble Blower Fan

Overview

The Switch Adapted Bubble Blower Fan is a commercial toy modified for use with an assistive switch. The Switch Adapted Bubble Blower may be beneficial to someone who may have difficulty pressing the original small activation button due to its size, location, or required activation force.

Usage

Attach an assistive switch with a 3.5 mm plug to the 3.5 mm jack on the toy. When the assistive switch is activated, the toy will generate bubbles.

Cost

The toy is commercially available for about $5. A suitable jack and the necessary wire will bring the total cost to approximately $10.

Build Instructions

An installation guide is available at the linked repository.

Time Required

Assembly Time: 20-30 minutes

Tools

  • Screwdriver, Phillips, Small
  • Soldering Iron
  • De-soldering braid / Solder sucker
  • Hot Glue Gun

 

Components

  • 1X Play Day Bubble Blower Fan
  • 1X 3.5 mm Mono Panel Mount Jack
  • 2X Wire, 8 cm

 

3D Printing

This design does not have any 3D printed components.

Programming

This design does not require any programming.

 

Attribution

The method and documentation were developed by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change.

Switch Adapted Water Gun

Overview

This is a switch adapted water gun that is compatible with 3.5mm switches. This device may be beneficial to someone with limited hand function that is interested in using a water gun.

Usage

The Switch Adapted Water Gun can be used with any 3.5mm switch. If you do not own one, you can request one from our device library.

Cost

The device costs approximately $35 to adapt.

Build Instructions

A set of build instructions to adapt this toy can be found in the Assembly Guide linked above.

Skills Required

  • Mechanics
  • Soldering

Time Required

  • 3D Print Time: 3 hours 15 minutes
  • Assembly Time: Approximately 1 hour

Tools

  • Drill with ¼” bit
  • Small flat head or Phillips screwdriver (it must be skinny as the screws are in deep)
  • Flush Cutters
  • Wire Strippers
  • Soldering Iron and Solder
  • Scissors

Components

  • 1x electric water gun
  • 1x 3.5mm mono jack and nut
  • 2x wires 15cm long
  • 1x copper tape 8mm long
  • 1x zip tie
  • 1x 1cm x 1cm card stock or paper
  • 4x AA batteries
  • 1x 1/4″-20 UNC hex bolt, 1/2″ length
  • 1x 1/4″-20 UNC Tee Nut Insert

3D Printing

  • 1x Water Gun Stand

Attribution

Toy adaption by Kerilyn Kennedy – Makers Making Change

3D Printed Water Gun Stand designed by Kerilyn Kennedy – Makers Making Change

Documentation by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change

Switch Adapted Bubble Blower

Overview

The Gazillion Tornado Bubble Machine is an adapted toy that has a 3.5 mm jack and can be used with an assistive switch.

Usage

To activate the device, an assistive switch with a 3.5 mm jack can be plugged into the bubble blower. The Switch Adapted Bubble Blower may be beneficial to someone who may have difficulty pressing the original small activation button due to its size, location, or required activation force.

Cost

This toy can be adapted for approximately $20.

Build Instructions

A set of build instructions can be found in the Assembly Guide linked above.

Skills Required

  • Mechanics, Soldering

Time Required

Approximately 1 hour

Tools

  • Drill with ¼” drill bit
  • Wire Strippers
  • Flush Cutters
  • Narrow flat headed screwdriver (the screws are triangle, but a flat head should work)
  • Soldering Iron
  • Solder
  • Ruler
  • Hot glue gun

 

Components

  • Gazillion Tornado Bubble Machine
  • Mono Jack
  • 2x 8 cm pieces of Wire

Attribution

Toy Adaption by Kerilyn Kennedy – Makers Making Change.

Documentation by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change.

 

Penguin Switch Adapted Toy

Overview

The switch adapted Cool Beats Penguin toy sings, dances, lights up and can be controlled with accessible switches that have a 3.5 mm jack. The penguin is a Fisher Price toy that teaches the alphabet, opposites, counting, and bobs side to side with lights and music.

Usage

To activate the penguin, the power switch must be turned on, which is located on bottom of the penguin. Once turned on, the assistive switches can be used as an alternative to the green and red buttons on the penguin’s feet for activation. The switch adapted toy would be beneficial for someone who may have difficulty pressing the original buttons on the toy. Some people may find the original buttons too hard to press, too small, or out of reach for appropriate use. If you don’t already own a 3.5mm jack switch, one can also be requested from the device library.

Build Instructions

You can build the switch adapted penguin by following the video tutorial by “Santa” Gerry Galland. There is also a written assembly guide linked above on the MMC Github page. You can also follow the “How to prep your 3.5mm headphone jack” documentation if needed.

Skills Required

  • Mechanics
  • Soldering

Time Required

  • Less than 1 hour

Tools

  • Drill with ¼” drill bit
  • Wire Strippers
  • Flush Cutters
  • Phillips screwdriver
  • Soldering Iron
  • Solder
  • Ruler

Components

  • 1x Cool Beats Penguin
  • 2x Mono jack
  • Wire

Attribution

Documentation created by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change – based on instructional video by “Santa” Jerry Galland.

 

 

Boppin’ Beaver Switch Adapted Toy

Overview

The switch adapted Boppin’ Beaver toy sings and dances and can be controlled with accessible switches that have a 3.5 mm jack. The beaver is a Fisher Price toy that teaches ABCs, 123, opposites, and simple games.

Usage

You can use the Boppin’ Beaver by plugging in a switch. Then, press the switch to activate the beaver.

Build Instructions

You can build the Boppin’ Beaver by following the video tutorial by “Santa” Gerry Galland. There is also a written assembly guide linked above on the MMC Github page. You can also follow the “How to prep your 3.5mm headphone jack” documentation if needed.

TOOLS

  • Drill with ¼” drill bit
  • Wire Strippers
  • Flush Cutters
  • Phillips screwdriver
  • Soldering Iron
  • Solder
  • Ruler

COMPONENTS

  • Boppin’ Beaver Linkimal
  • Mono jack
  • Wire

Attribution

Documentation created by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change – based on instructional video by “Santa” Jerry Galland.

Instructional Video by “Santa” Jerry Galland.

 

Spinning Light Wand Toy Adaptation

Overview

The Spinning Light Wand Adaptation comprises instructions and files to adapt a commercially available Spinning Light Wand toy for use with an assistive switch. The toy is modified so that it has a 3.5 mm jack in place of the button.

Usage

Connect an assistive switch with a 3.5 mm mono plug to the 3.5 mm mono jack on the base of the adapted toy. When the assistive switch is activated, the lights will turn on and spin within the plastic globe. The spinning wand stands in a 3D printed base. There are two versions of this base available for request: v1.0, and v1.1. Please specify to the maker which version you would like.

red and yellow wand that has lights in it that spin

Version 1.1
Picture of switch adapted spinning light wand toy in a 3d printed base.Version 1.0

Cost

The cost of materials for this project is approximately $15 CAD. This does not include the cost of component shipping.

Build Instructions

The necessary files and information required to switch adapt the toy switch are available in the linked GitHub repository or via the downloadable Zip file. The build consists of a commercially available toy, some 3D printed components, and some electronic components. Refer to the Spinning Light Wand Adaptation Assembly Guide.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing
  • Soldering
  • Mechanics

Time Required

Version 1.1:

  • 3D Printing: ~3 hr
  • Assembly: ~1 hr

Version 1.0:

  • 3D Printing: ~6 hr
  • Assembly: ~1 hr

Tools/Materials

Version 1.1:

  • #0 Phillips Screwdriver
  • #0 Robertson Screwdriver (depending on which screws you got)
  • Soldering Iron & Solder
  • Hot Glue Gun & Hot Glue sticks

Version 1.0:

  • #0 Phillips Screwdriver
  • Flat head screwdriver
  • Soldering Iron & Solder
  • Hot Glue Gun & Hot Glue sticks
  • Super Glue

Components

Refer to the Bill of Materials.

Version 1.1:

  • 1x Spinning Light Wand Toy
  • 1x 3.5 m Mono Jack
  • 2x 30cm pieces of wire
  • 2x #4 1/2″ screws
  • 4x Nonslip Circles

Version 1.0:

  • 1x Spinning Light Wand Toy
  • 1x 3.5 m Mono Jack
  • 2x 20cm pieces of wire

3D Printing

Refer to the Spinning Light Wand Adaptation 3D Printing Guide.

Version 1.1:

  • 1x Wand Base
  • 1x Jack Cover

Version 1.0:

  • 1x Wand Base
  • 1x Bottom Cover

Attribution

This adaptation was designed by Mimi Xia of the [Makers Making Change Vancouver Chapter] (https://vanhack.ca/wp/makers-making-change-vancouver-chapter/) under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.

3D Printed Wand Base v1.0 designed by Mimi Xia under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.

3D Printed Wand Base v1.1 designed by Jake McIvor – Makers Making Change under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.

Neil Squire / Makers Making Change assisted with the creation of the documentation that is under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.