Assistive Switches

Wearable Clap Switch

Overview

The Wearable Clap Switch is a wireless assistive switch designed for users that have difficulty using traditional pressure based switches. It consists of a hand mounted transmitter, and a receiver box. When the transmitter detects a clap motion, it sends a signal to the receiver which activates the mono jack. The receiver can be used to activate an 3.5 mm assistive device like a switch adapted toy.

The original version of this project is called the Wearable Bluetooth Controller for Switch Adapted Toys. It was released by r570sv on Instructables under a CC-BY-NC-SA license.

Usage

When a clap motion is detected by the hand-mounted transmitter, the receiver will activate the connected assistive device.

Transmitter

Attach the transmitter to the users hand or wrist using the strap.

To activate the transmitter, slide the switch on the bottom of the transmitter. The transmitter will start looking for a connection, and if a receiver is broadcasting, the two will connect. Once the two have connected, the transmitter will send a signal to the receiver whenever it detects a clap.

The sensitivity of the clap detection can be adjusted using the two buttons on the top of the case. Pressing the increase sensitivity button will cause the number of illuminated LEDs in the circle to increase. Pressing the decrease sensitivity button will cause the number of illuminated LEDs in the circle to decrease.

Receiver

Connect the assistive device to the output port on the receiver using a 3.5 mm cable.

To active the receiver, flip the toggle switch from off to on. The receiver will start looking for a connection, and if the transmitter is broadcasting, the two will connect. Once they have connected, the receiver will power a relay to activate the mono jack.

To change how long the jack stays activated, adjust the potentiometer labeled Duration. To change the cooldown between activations, adjust the potentiometer labeled Delay.

Cost

~$110

Build Instructions

The transmitter is assembled with mostly off the shelf parts, the only addition being the soldering of a power switch onto the battery line. All the shell and other mechanical components are 3D printed. For the receiver, there is medium soldering to assemble the protoboard

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing
  • Soldering

Time Required

  • 3D Print Time: 12h 8min
  • Assembly Time: 1h

Tools

  • 3D printer
  • Soldering iron
  • Hobby knife
  • Multimeter
  • Flush cutters
  • Flux

Components

  • 1X Transmitter
  • 1X Receiver

3D Printing

All components can be printed with no support at 20% infill with a 0.2mm layer height. All pieces can be printed using PLA filament Programming

Attribution

The original design of the Wearable Bluetooth Controller for Switch Adapted Toys was released by r570sv  under a CC-BY-NC-SA license.
Updated 3D Printed Receiver Design, code, and documentation by Brad Wellington / Makers Making Change.

Finger Lift Switch

Overview

The Finger Lift Switch is an assistive switch that is activated by lifting a resting finger upwards. The switch activation distance is approximately 5 mm and the required operating force is 2 to 5 grams, depending on balance screw adjustment.

Usage

Connect the cable to an assistive device with a 3.5 mm input jack. The user’s lifting fingertip should be placed under the finger lift pad, resting on a lower surface or splint.

When the user raises their lifting finger, the finger lift lever will rotate and activate the switch. The switch will de-activate when the user lowers their lifting finger back to the resting surface.

Cost

The cost of components for a single switch is approximately $11 CAD. However, obtaining the minimum quantities  for a single build will bring the materials costs to $66 CAD.

 

Build Instructions

The Finger Lift Switch consists of 3D printed parts and electronic components. The Assembly Guide is available at the GitHub repository.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing
  • Soldering
  • Assembling screws

Time Required

3D Printing Time: 1hr 30m

Assembly Time: 30m

Tools

  • Soldering Iron (fine tip)
  • 60/40 rosin core electrical solder
  • Medium size Phillips screwdriver (type #1)
  • Side cutters
  • Wire strippers
  • Super glue (gel type is best)
  • Hot melt glue gun (low temp type)
  • Permanent felt marker (fine tip)
  • Needle nose pliers
  • Sturdy metal tweezers
  • Multimeter (with continuity reading capability)

 

Components

  • 1X Ball Bearing: Type MR85ZZ (8 mm OD 5 mm ID)
  • 2X 5 mm x 1 mm Magnets (Neodymium)
  • 1X Reed Switch (Glass) Contact Normally Open (N/O) Magnetic Induction Switch (2 mm × 14 mm)
  • 2X M3 x 8 mm Stainless Steel screws (Base & Base Cap screws)
  • 1X M3 x 10 mm Stainless Steel screw (Counterweight screw)
  • 1X M3 x 12 mm Stainless Steel screw (Bearing Screw)
  • 1X M3 x 16 mm Stainless Steel screw (Balance screw)
  • 5X M3 Stainless Steel Nut
  • 1X 1/4-20 (Imperial size) Nut
  • 1X 5-foot mono audio cable with 3.5 mm male phono plug

 

3D Printing

  • 1X Finger Lift Lever (3D)
  • 1X Balance Screw Holder (3D)
  • 1X Counterweight Nut Holder (3D)
  • 1X Bearing Base (3D)
  • 1X Bearing Base Cap (3D)
  • 1X Reed Switch Plate (3D)

Design

This design was created using OpenSCAD.

Attribution

Designed by Makers Making Change (Derrick Andrews) in conjunction with Sunnyhill

Camera Mount Adapters for the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit

Overview

This device contains 12 total adapters for all the buttons in the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit. To view or request a single adapter for a button from this kit, click the names of the respective adapters below:

The Camera Mount Adapters for Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit are inexpensive, easy, and quick to build adapters for all of the buttons in the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit. These adapters allow the buttons to be mounted on standard camera mounting equipment using the standard camera mount threads (¼”-20 UNC). These adapters were originally designed by ATMakers and more information on their switch mounts is available here.

Sizing

Size Photo of Button Photo of Camera Adapter
Large Large Button from Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit Large Camera Mount Adapter on wood background.
Small Small Button from Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit Small Camera Mount Adapter on wood background.
Trigger Variable Trigger Button from Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit Trigger Camera Mount Adapter on wood background.
Light Touch Light Touch Button from Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit Light Touch Camera Mount Adapter on wood background.

Camera Mounting Options:

Some possible mounting options using these camera mount adapters are tripods, flexible “gooseneck” mounts or a magic arm as shown below:

Logitech Trigger Button with adapter and magic arm stand.

Cost

The total cost of this device includes the cost of the PLA filament used to print the device, the T-Nut used to provide threads, and the two screws used to attach the device to the appropriate Logitech Button.

The total cost of the full kit (12 mounts) comes to approximately $26.15.

A 1/4″ washer and a ¼” – 20 screw (at least ½” length) are temporarily needed to install the T-Nut. If needed to purchase, this will increase the cost of the device to approximately $2.

A more complete Bill of Materials is provided in the BOM spreadsheet in the linked GitHub repository.

Build Instructions

This device consists of a single 3D-Printed part, two screws and one T-Nut. The necessary files and instructions for 3D printing as well as the assembly guide are in the linked GitHub Repository.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D printing ~11.57 hours
  • Assembly ~30 minutes

Tools

  • 3D Printer
  • Screwdriver
  • ¼”-20 machine screw (at least ½” length) and washer for assembly.

Components

  • 3D-Printed housing.
  • ¼”-20 Barbed T-Nut 5/16” barrel length.
  • 2x M3 x 8mm machine screws.

3D Printing

Refer to the 3D Printing Guide available in the Linked GitHub Repository.

Attribution

Original Design created by ATMakers under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license.

Documentation, modified design, design files and build files created by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license

Low Profile Switch

Overview

This is a cost-effective 3D printable accessibility switch that only requires the user to lift their finger or hand as high as 8 mm to use it. The switch measures 65 mm L x 65 mm W x 13 mm H and is built using a standard 3.5 mm cable. Using the specified model of tactile switch, the activation force to use the switch is low and is comparable to the force required to activate the light touch switch.

Usage

The switch is well-suited for use by a finger or hand. This switch would be beneficial for someone who may have a limited range of motion  and would benefit from using a switch that has a large activation area with a minimum switch height. This switch can be plugged into any standard AT interface that uses a 3.5mm cables, including the the Xbox Adaptive Controller (XAC).

Build Instructions

SKILLS REQUIRED

  • 3D Printing
  • Soldering

TOOLS

  • Soldering Iron and Solder
  • Wire Strippers / Wire Cutters
  • Hot Glue Gun and Glue

COMPONENTS

  • 1x 3.5 mm Mono Cable
  • 1x 12mm Tactile Switch

3D PRINTING

  • 1x 3D Printed Top
  • 1x 3D Printed Base

All components can be printed with no support at 20% infill with a 0.2mm layer height. 3D print files are linked above.

Attribution

Designed by Kerilyn Kennedy – Makers Making Change

Documentation created by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change

 

Solderless Unibody Switch

Overview

The Solderless Unibody Switch is a simple switch that enables the user to easily activate a button. This device is suitable for users with limited dexterity and finger movement. The unique design of the single-piece print and few electronic components enables the maker to build the device without the use of a soldering iron, allowing the device to be more accessible and buildable for makers.

Usage

The Solderless Unibody Switch is a simple device that is meant to be made accessible to makers that don’t have access to a soldering iron. This device is intended for individuals that are looking for a switch that has a lower profile.

Build Instructions

An assembly guide can be found in the documentation on this device page. If you are fulfilling a request for this device, please take a look at the maker checklist document before you start the build to help walk you through the process.

SKILLS REQUIRED

  • Fine motor skills – Applying a small amount of super glue
  • Pulling – Tightening zip tie
  • Gripping – Using tools/lighter

TOOLS

  • Super glue
  • Flush cutters
  • Wire strippers
  • Heat Gun / Lighter
  • Needle nose pliers (optional)

COMPONENTS

3D PRINTING

1x – Body of switch (STL and printing guide can be found in the design files link above)

Attribution

Justin Pezzin – Makers Making Change

Assistive Switches Kit

Switches are assistive devices used by people with limited dexterity. They can be used for many purposes including accessing phones, computers, TV set top boxes, adapted toys, and appliances.

Switches can also be used for adaptive gaming, which levels the playing field for gamers with disabilities. The switches in this kit are compatible with the Xbox Adaptive Controller and PC gaming on Windows 10 (click here for an XAC setup tutorial). External devices such as switches, buttons, mounts and joysticks can be arranged in a way to meet the needs of the gamer making it uniquely theirs. Adaptive gaming allows the user to completely individualize their gaming setup.

The Adaptive Switches Kit is composed of 5 switches:

  • 1 x raindrop switch– Low force switch well-suited for use by a finger or head
  • 1 x light touch switch – Low force switch well-suited for use by a finger.
  • 1 x interact switch – Medium force switch that is activated through applying pressure on the top surface.
  • 2 x round flexure switch – Medium force switch that is activated through applying pressure on the top surface.

All devices are 3D printed and made by volunteer makers in Canada and the US at one of our build events.

Corrugated Plastic Switch

Overview

The Corrugated Plastic Switch works well for users looking for a large surface for targeting at a low cost. The switch is made from simple materials and can be replicated and modified easily. Similar in concept to the DIY Cardboard Switch, the switch works as a simple on or off button while attached to an electronic toy or appliance.  When given access to a switch, the user becomes an active participant in accessing the item and is able to use the switch to interact with the device.

Usage

The Corrugated Plastic Switch is ideal for users looking for a temporary switch to test sizing and activation forces with. This switch also works well as a quick replacement if an existing switch breaks. Users with difficulty targeting switches may find this device helpful with its larger surface area.

Build Instructions

Information on building the Corrugated Plastic Switch can be found in the instructions linked, along with the list of materials required.

Attribution

Made by: Jamie Mayo

Suction Cup Single Switch Mount

Overview

This is a switch mount based on a commercially available glass suction cup. The glass suction cup is modified with an alternative base that provides a location for mounting an assistive switch. The switch mount can be temporarily anchored to a smooth surface for high holding power. These items can be used for people who need easily adjustable switch positioning for operating AAC devices and play.

Usage

A suitable assistive switch is attached to the Switch Mount base. The Suction Cup Single Switch Mount is positioned in an appropriate location for the user on a smooth surface with the lever in the upright open position. The lever is then rotated down to engage the suction cup to the surface.

To remove or reposition the switch mount, the lever is returned to the vertically upright open position.

Build Instructions

The Suction Cup Single Switch Mount is comprised of a commercially available suction cup and a 3d printed adapter. The assistive switch is not included and should be supplied or requested separately.

Bill of Materials

1X Glass Suction Cup with 4-2/3 inch diameter cups (e.g. https://www.amazon.com/FCHO-Suction-Aluminum-Vacuum-Lifting/dp/B07HNRB2CJ, https://www.amazon.com/FCHO-Suction-Aluminum-Handle-Lifting/dp/B07DK7NKS1, ~$15)

1X 3D Printed Switch Mount Base (~$3)

3D Printing

The 3D printed Switch Mount Base is a single component and the STL file available in the downloadables section. The print requires support and is about a 6hr 20m print. The print requires about a 100 grams of material (~$3).

Assembly

First, the glass suction cup tool is disassembled to remove the original metal base. A video demonstrating the disassembly process for a similar design can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0AqfpCvtOqA.

The retaining ring is removed from the pin and stored where it won’t get lost. A clamp is used to take the tension off the suction cup, and the pin is removed along with the lever. The remaining parts are separated from the original metal base.

The suction cup parts are then reassembled into the 3d printed Switch Mount base.

DIY Cardboard Switch

Overview

The DIY Cardboard Switch is a simple adaptive switch built using common household items. The switch works as a simple on or off button while attached to an electronic toy or appliance. The user can activate the switch in order to safely turn the item on or off. When given access to a switch, the user becomes an active participant in accessing the item. With the addition of a Makey Makey, the user can access computer programs or games. One such activity allows the user to play bongos sounds with each press of the switch.

Usage

In order to use the DIY Cardboard Switch, the user must connect the Makey Makey Classic and the switch(es) as shown in the How To guide. Once the user connects the devices, the user can press the switch(es) in order to control the chosen action(s).

Build Instructions

Information on building the DIY Cardboard Switch can be found in the Makey Makey How To guide linked. Additionally, links for the items required to build the project are also found in the guide.

Attribution

Made by: Katie Butzu & Mark Lyons

Simple Switch Tester

Overview

The Simple Switch Tester is a cost effective, open source assistive technology for testing assistive switches. When an assistive switch is connected to the tester via the 3.5 mm jack and activated, a light on the tester will illuminate indicating that the switch is functioning correctly. The tester is powered by two AAA batteries. A test button on the side of the tester allows the batteries to be tested to confirm the tester is working correctly before testing a switch.

 

Usage

Press the test button on the Switch Tester to confirm that the tester is working and has adequate battery power. If the tester is working properly, the light should turn on. Next, connect the assistive switch to be tested to the Switch Tester using the 3.5 mm jack. Activate the assistive switch. If the switch is working properly, the light on the Switch Tester will illuminate when the switch is activated.

 

Build Instructions

All information to build the Simple Switch Tester is available at GitHub. This build consists of 3D printed components, and electronic components that are soldered together. The electronic components are inserted into the 3D printed components once they are soldered.

Attribution

Design and Assembly Instructions: Makers Making Change