Makey Makey

Braille Calculator

Overview

The Braille Calculator uses a Makey Makey Classic, 3D printed Braille, and a scratch project to allow users to do simple addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division, with audio feedback. The calculator allows the user to input a mathematical expression, guess the answer, and finally gives the correct answer. The calculator then audibly verifies if the user’s answer was correct or incorrect. This device can be used with any PC, tablet, phone, or device with a USB (type-A) port and internet connection.

Usage

This device is intended for individuals with a visual impairment in an education setting to practice math. The user is able to interact with an online calculator project created in Scratch that audibly interacts with their inputs using the brass contact points. The calculator includes 3D printed Braille labels of what each contact point represents. The calculator is capable of performing a single multiplication, division, addition, or subtraction action at a time. This calculator is compatible with any device that has a USB (type-A) port and an internet connection.

An example of the usage of this device is in the photos and video section of the GitHub page linked above.

Build Instructions

An assembly guide can be found in the documentation on this device page. If you are fulfilling a request for this device, please take a look at the maker checklist document before you start the build to help walk you through the process.

SKILLS REQUIRED

  • 3D Printing
  • Assembly

TOOLS

  • Glue (hot glue, stick glue, etc)
  • 3D printer
  • Scissors
  • Ink Printer
  • Wire stripper

COMPONENTS

3D PRINTING

Device requires 19 3D printed Braille labels. These are quick and take minimal filament. The 3D print files are downloadable on this page and do not require supports to print. The 3D printing guide file gives recommendations on settings for a successful print.

Attribution

Through our partnership with Makey Makey, Katie Butzu, and Mark Lyons, workshops were hosted to help disability professionals learn how they could gamify their work. Then we challenged these disability professionals to create their own assistive technology for clients! This project was created by Tracy Zhang and modified by the MMC team to include 3D printed Braille.

Hula Hoop Game Controller

Overview

The Hula Hoop Game Controller is an adaptive controller which helps aid gross motor coordination for upper and lower extremities. A user can use the device to control directional keys on a computer. This allows the user to add fun games to their therapeutic activities. While sitting or standing, the user is able to operate the controller with their upper extremities. Additionally, the user can place the controller on the floor in order to to use it with their lower extremities while sitting.

Usage

In order to use the Hula Hoop Game Controller, the user must connect the Makey Makey Classic and Hula Hoop as done in the How To guide. Once the user connects the devices, the user can hold or touch any of the conductive tape areas to control the corresponding directional keys.

Build Instructions

Information on how to build the Hula Hoop Game Controller can be found in the Makey Makey How To guide linked. Links for the items required to build the project are also found in the link.

Attribution

Made by: Katie Butzu & Mark Lyons

 

Musical Paint Brushes

Overview

“Musical Paint Brushes” are a simple adaptive controller that offers many therapeutic benefits. Some of those benefits include improving fine motor coordination, grasp, visual motor coordination and more. To use “Musical Paint Brushes”, a user paints on wet paper to control an activity. One such activity is allowing the user to play a musical note with each stroke of paint. A user can also control multiple notes by connecting multiple brushes to the Makey Makey.

Usage

In order to use “Musical Paint Brushes” the user must connect the Makey Makey Classic and the paint brushes as shown in the How To guide. Additionally, the user will need to prep a wet sheet of paper that they can paint on. Once the user connects the devices and has the paper ready, the user can touch any of the brushes to the paper in order to control the chosen actions.

Build Instructions

Information on how to build “Musical Paint Brushes” can be found in the Makey Makey How To guide linked. Links for the items required to build the project are also found in the link.

Attribution

Made by: Katie Butzu & Mark Lyons

DIY Cardboard Switch

Overview

The DIY Cardboard Switch is a simple adaptive switch built using common household items. The switch works as a simple on or off button while attached to an electronic toy or appliance. The user can activate the switch in order to safely turn the item on or off. When given access to a switch, the user becomes an active participant in accessing the item. With the addition of a Makey Makey, the user can access computer programs or games. One such activity allows the user to play bongos sounds with each press of the switch.

Usage

In order to use the DIY Cardboard Switch, the user must connect the Makey Makey Classic and the switch(es) as shown in the How To guide. Once the user connects the devices, the user can press the switch(es) in order to control the chosen action(s).

Build Instructions

Information on building the DIY Cardboard Switch can be found in the Makey Makey How To guide linked. Additionally, links for the items required to build the project are also found in the guide.

Attribution

Made by: Katie Butzu & Mark Lyons