Mobility

Serial Hand-Raiser

Overview 

It’s important to be able to catch the attention of a professor/teacher if you simply need to ask a question. Raising hand is a standard way of getting others attention around the world regardless of the environment and it’s globally used in classrooms. Unfortunately, it may not be possible for everyone to physically raise their hands and we need alternative visual device could help them.

This device would be beneficial for someone who has difficulty or is unable to raise their hand for an extended period of time.

Usage 

The Serial-Hand-Raiser uses a RGB LED to send feedback by flashing colors according to the incoming requests through the USB connection. It uses web serial to communicate with host through a web app. This allows the users to send different colours actions to the device to and display visual feedback to other users.

The web app can be accessed through following web page:

Serial-Hand-Raiser App

Compatibility

Serial-Hand-Raiser can be used to provide visual feedback via a web browser installed in the host device. The following web browsers are compatible:

Cost

The Serial-Hand-Raiser costs approximately $14.

Build Instructions 

All the required assembly documentation, software, hardware are documented in the project GitHub repository. All the necessary electronics for this project are listed and can be purchased online via provided hyperlinks in the bill of materials (BOM) file.

Skills Required

  •  3D Printing Skills
  • Programming

Time Required

  • Total print time: 60 minutes
  • Assembly Time: 10 minutes

Tools

  •  3D Printer
  • Computer with USB port

Components

  • 1x Adafruit QT Py – SAMD21 Link
  • 1x USB Cable – USB A to USB C – Link

3D Printing

All components can be printed with no support at 20% infill. There are 3 pieces to the enclosure:

  • 1x Bottom Plate
  • 1x Holder Plate
  • 1x Top plate – (Translucent filament)

Attribution 

The code for this device is licensed under the MIT license.

The Hand-Raiser 3D printed housing is licensed under the Creative Commons – Attribution – Non-Commercial – Share Alike license.

Wireless Assistive Switch Link

Overview

The Wireless Assistive Switch Link is a device that enables a wireless connection between an assistive switch and an output device that has a 3.5 mm jack. In addition to momentary control, the device also has the option of pre-set timed latches of 10 seconds, 1 minute, or 5 minutes. This device may be useful for someone who would benefit from a wireless connection between the switch and the output device or using the latching feature for output devices.

Usage

An assistive switch is connected to the 3.5 mm jack on the transmitter. The 3.5 mm plug on the receiver is then connected to the input of the device to be controlled. With the receiver powered on, the receiver will activate the output device when the assistive switch is activated.

The device can operate in several modes:

  • Momentary Switch: The output device will turn off about 0.5 seconds after the user stops pressing the switch.
  • Toggle Switch: Activating the assistive switch will activate the output device. The output device will remain on until the assistive switch is released, and pressed again.
  • 10 Second Latched Timer: After the assistive switch is pressed and released, the output device will remain on for 10 seconds and then turn off.
  • 1 Minute Latched Timer: After the assistive switch is pressed and released, the output device will remain on for 1 minute and then turn off.
  • 5 Minute Latched Timer: After the assistive switch is pressed and released, the output device will remain on for 5 minutes and then turn off.

The mode can be changed by pressing the Mode Button on the Receiver. See the User Guide for instructions.

Cost

This device can be built for approximately $40.

Build Instructions

This build consists of 3D printable parts and some commercial off-the-shelf hardware. Refer to the Assembly Guide, Bill of Materials, and 3D Print Guide for instructions on what parts to obtain, and how to print the parts.

Skills Required

  • Soldering
  • 3D Printing
  • Mechanics

 

Time Required

3D Printing Time: 5 hours 30 minutes

Assembly Time: < 1 hour

Tools

  • Small Phillips screwdriver
  • Soldering Iron and Solder
  • Wire Strippers

 

Components

  • Wireless Relay Remote
  • Battery holder for 3 AA batteries
  • 3 x AA batteries
  • 2x Latching Switches
  • 1x 3.5mm Male to Female Cable

 

3D Printing

Refer to the Maker Guide for 3D Printing Instructions.

Design

This device was designed in Autodesk Fusion 360. Original design files are in the repository.

Attribution

Designed by Kerilyn Kennedy – Makers Making Change

Documentation by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change

Customizable Beverage Can Opener

Overview

The Customizable Beverage Can Opener provides a way for those with arthritis, low finger dexterity, low vision, or other related disabilities to open beverage cans with little strength or accuracy required. There are three different handles available for use with this device, hence the name “customizable”:

Base Can Opener:

CAD rendering of the base can opener

The Base Can Opener has a sloped hole which fits over almost all beverage can tabs. The device includes a graphic that describes which side should be facing upwards when opening the can and an arrow pointing towards the can opening. The device is designed to be used on its own or with the handle attached, as described below:

Cylindrical Handle

CAD rendering of the cylindrical handle

This handle is designed to fit the hand and is easy to grip for those with arthritis.

Flat Handle

CAD rendering of the flat handle

The Flat Handle is designed for someone with limited hand function and uses the wrist or elbow to open the can once the can opener is placed on the pull-tab.

Loop Handle

CAD rendering of the loop handle

The Loop Handle is designed to open beverage cans without using fingers. The loop slides over the user’s hand, then the can opener can be used by lifting and twisting the hand.

Similar Devices

Cost

The total material cost for the base can opener and all three of the handles is approximately $2.50 CAD. The total cost for the base can opener and one of the handles is slightly over $1 CAD.

Build Instructions

The base can opener can be attached to any of the handles by sliding the base can opener into the hole in the handle. If the fit is too loose, add super glue into the hole.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D Printing:
    • Base Can Opener: 1 hour.
    • Handle: 3-4 hours each.

Tools

Super glue or five-minute epoxy.

Components

  • Base Can Opener
  • Cylindrical Handle
  • Flat Handle
  • Loop Handle

3D Printing

Full instructions can be found in the 3D Printing guide in the linked GitHub repository.

Attribution

Idea for base can opener based on the design of pop-top can opener by Thingiverse User VegasGuy under the Creative Commons license – Attribution – Non-Commercial – No Derivatives.

Idea for Flat Handle based on Can Opener Helper by Pole Ergo under the Creative Commons license – Attribution – Non-Commercial – No Derivative.

Full Design and Documentation by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Pull-Tab Tin Can Opener

Overview

The Pull-Tab Tin Can Opener is a device to help those with arthritis, limited finger dexterity or limited finger strength open tin cans with pull-tabs. This device is compatible with any tin can with a pull-tab, such as tuna, pet food or soup cans.

Original device listing on printables.com: https://www.printables.com/model/192535-can-opener

Similar Devices

The “Related Projects” section at the bottom of this webpage also includes links to these devices as well as other similar devices.

Usage

This device can open tin cans with pull-tabs in a single motion. Refer to the User Guide in the linked GitHub repository for detailed instructions on how to open cans using this device.

Cost

Approximately 50 cents.

Build Instructions

This device consists of a single 3D printed part.

Skills Required

3D printing.

Time Required

  • 3D printing time: 2 hours and 2 minutes.
  • Assembly Time: None

Tools

3D printing.

3D Printing

Refer to the 3D printing guide in the linked GitHub repository.

Attribution

Design by Printlab user 4xsample under the CC0 license.

Documentation by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change under the CC BY SA 4.0 license.

Switch Adapted Bubble Blower

Overview

The Gazillion Tornado Bubble Machine is an adapted toy that has a 3.5 mm jack and can be used with an assistive switch.

Usage

To activate the device, an assistive switch with a 3.5 mm jack can be plugged into the bubble blower. The Switch Adapted Bubble Blower may be beneficial to someone who may have difficulty pressing the original small activation button due to its size, location, or required activation force.

Cost

This toy can be adapted for approximately $20.

Build Instructions

A set of build instructions can be found in the Assembly Guide linked above.

Skills Required

  • Mechanics, Soldering

Time Required

Approximately 1 hour

Tools

  • Drill with ¼” drill bit
  • Wire Strippers
  • Flush Cutters
  • Narrow flat headed screwdriver (the screws are triangle, but a flat head should work)
  • Soldering Iron
  • Solder
  • Ruler
  • Hot glue gun

 

Components

  • Gazillion Tornado Bubble Machine
  • Mono Jack
  • 2x 8 cm pieces of Wire

Attribution

Toy Adaption by Kerilyn Kennedy – Makers Making Change.

Documentation by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change.

 

Analog Thumbstick

Overview

This is a cost-effective analog thumbstick intended to be used for adapted gaming with the Xbox Adaptive Controller (XAC). This device is a more affordable option to commercial thumbsticks on the market. This thumbstick is easy to use and gets plugged into the jacks in the back of the XAC. The design is based on a traditional PS2 thumbstick that is mounted into a 3D printed housing. The original plastic joystick topper can be swapped out for a 3D printed “U” shaped topper to make it easier to use.

Usage

The Analog Thumbstick is connected to the XAC by plugging the TRRS plug into the “X1 ” or ” X2″ jack on the back of the controller. If so equipped, the optional “push button” feature is connected by plugging into the is enabled on the thumbstick, a second mono jack will be plugged into the “L” or “R” mono jack that look like joystick icons. The joystick can also be used with the “U” shaped topper. This may be beneficial to someone who may not have the dexterity to use a smaller joystick, or someone who may have limited sensation in their fingers but still has enough wrist movement to use a joystick.

Compatibility

This thumbstick is compatible with the Xbox Adaptive controller. The XAC can be used with an Xbox Series X|S or Xbox One, Windows PC, iOS devices, Android mobile devices, as well as other gaming consoles with an appropriate adapter.

Cost

The thumbstick costs approximately $30 to build. Note, the device can be built for cheaper if more than one is ordered as several of the parts for this device come in larger quantities than needed for one device.

Build Instructions

A set of build instructions can be found in the assembly guide that is linked above.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing
  • Mechanics

Time Required

3D Printing Time:

  • Joystick Housing: 2:47
  • U-shaped Topper: 4:22

Assembly Time: 10 minutes

Tools

  • Small Flat Headed Screwdriver
  • Tape

Components

  • 1x Joystick
  • 16x Dupont Wires
  • 2x Headphone Plugs – only one is needed if the “push button” feature of the joystick is not requested.
  • 8x #4 1/2″ screws

3D Printing

  • Joystick Top
  • Joystick Base

All components can be printed with no support at 20% infill with a 0.2mm layer height. 3D print files are linked above.

Attribution

3D printed joystick housing designed by Kerilyn Kennedy – Makers Making Change, inspired by Ron Nelson’s Slider enclosure.

Documentation created by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change.

Camera Mount Adapter for Logitech Adaptive Gaming – Variable Trigger Button

Overview

This is a device for mounting a single Variable Trigger Button from the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit. To mount all the switches in the kit, or another single switch from this kit, visit this page.

The Camera Mount Adapter for Logitech Adaptive Gaming – Variable Trigger Button is an inexpensive, easy, and quick to build adapter for the variable trigger button in the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit. These adapters allow the buttons to be mounted on standard camera mounting equipment using the standard camera mount threads (¼”-20 UNC). This adapter was originally designed by ATMakers and more information on their switch mounts is available here.

Camera Mounting Options:

Some possible mounting options using these camera mount adapters are tripods, flexible “gooseneck” mounts or a magic arm as shown below:

Logitech Trigger Button with adapter and magic arm stand.

Cost

The total cost of this device includes the cost of the PLA filament used to print the device, the T-Nut used to provide threads, and the two screws used to attach the device to the appropriate Logitech Button.

The total cost of this mount comes to approximately $2.26

A 1/4″ washer and a ¼” – 20 screw (at least ½” length) are temporarily needed to install the T-Nut. If needed to purchase, this will increase the cost of the device to approximately $2.

A more complete Bill of Materials is provided in the BOM spreadsheet in the linked GitHub repository.

Build Instructions

This device consists of a single 3D-Printed part, two screws and one T-Nut. The necessary files and instructions for 3D printing as well as the assembly guide are in the linked GitHub Repository.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D printing ~1 hours
  • Assembly ~10 minutes

Tools

  • 3D Printer
  • Screwdriver
  • ¼”-20 machine screw (at least ½” length) and washer for assembly.

Components

  • 3D-Printed housing.
  • ¼”-20 Barbed T-Nut 5/16” barrel length.
  • 2x M3 x 8mm machine screws.

3D Printing

Refer to the 3D Printing Guide available in the Linked GitHub Repository.

Attribution

Original Design created by ATMakers under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license.

Documentation, modified design, design files and build files created by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.

Camera Mount Adapter for Logitech Adaptive Gaming – Small Button

Overview

This is a device for mounting a single Small Button from the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit. To mount all the switches in the kit, or another single switch from this kit, visit this page.

The Camera Mount Adapter for Logitech Adaptive Gaming – Small Button is an inexpensive, easy, and quick to build adapter for the small button in the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit. These adapters allow the buttons to be mounted on standard camera mounting equipment using the standard camera mount threads (¼”-20 UNC). This adapter was originally designed by ATMakers and more information on their switch mounts is available here.

Camera Mounting Options:

Some possible mounting options using these camera mount adapters are tripods, flexible “gooseneck” mounts or a magic arm as shown below:

Small button on magic arm.

Cost

The total cost of this device includes the cost of the PLA filament used to print the device, the T-Nut used to provide threads, and the two screws used to attach the device to the appropriate Logitech Button.

The total cost of this mount comes to approximately $2.26

A 1/4″ washer and a ¼” – 20 screw (at least ½” length) are temporarily needed to install the T-Nut. If needed to purchase, this will increase the cost of the device to approximately $2.

A more complete Bill of Materials is provided in the BOM spreadsheet in the linked GitHub repository.

Build Instructions

This device consists of a single 3D-Printed part, two screws and one T-Nut. The necessary files and instructions for 3D printing as well as the assembly guide are in the linked GitHub Repository.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D printing ~1 hours
  • Assembly ~10 minutes

Tools

  • 3D Printer
  • Screwdriver
  • ¼”-20 machine screw (at least ½” length) and washer for assembly.

Components

  • 3D-Printed housing.
  • ¼”-20 Barbed T-Nut 5/16” barrel length.
  • 2x M3 x 8mm machine screws.

3D Printing

Refer to the 3D Printing Guide available in the Linked GitHub Repository.

Attribution

Original Design created by ATMakers under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license.

Documentation, modified design, design files and build files created by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.

Camera Mount Adapter for Logitech Adaptive Gaming – Large Button

Overview

This is a device for mounting a single Large Button from the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit. To mount all the switches in the kit, or another single switch from this kit, visit this page.

The Camera Mount Adapter for Logitech Adaptive Gaming – Large Button is an inexpensive, easy, and quick to build adapter for the large button in the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit. These adapters allow the buttons to be mounted on standard camera mounting equipment using the standard camera mount threads (¼”-20 UNC). This adapter was originally designed by ATMakers and more information on their switch mounts is available here.

Camera Mounting Options:

Some possible mounting options using these camera mount adapters are tripods, flexible “gooseneck” mounts or a magic arm as shown below:

Camera Mount Adapter for Large Button from Logitech Adaptive Gaming kit on Magic Arm Mount.

Cost

The total cost of this device includes the cost of the PLA filament used to print the device, the T-Nut used to provide threads, and the two screws used to attach the device to the appropriate Logitech Button.

The total cost of this mount comes to approximately $2.26

A 1/4″ washer and a ¼” – 20 screw (at least ½” length) are temporarily needed to install the T-Nut. If needed to purchase, this will increase the cost of the device to approximately $2.

A more complete Bill of Materials is provided in the BOM spreadsheet in the linked GitHub repository.

Build Instructions

This device consists of a single 3D-Printed part, two screws and one T-Nut. The necessary files and instructions for 3D printing as well as the assembly guide are in the linked GitHub Repository.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D printing ~1 hours
  • Assembly ~10 minutes

Tools

  • 3D Printer
  • Screwdriver
  • ¼”-20 machine screw (at least ½” length) and washer for assembly.

Components

  • 3D-Printed housing.
  • ¼”-20 Barbed T-Nut 5/16” barrel length.
  • 2x M3 x 8mm machine screws.

3D Printing

Refer to the 3D Printing Guide available in the Linked GitHub Repository.

Attribution

Original Design created by ATMakers under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license.

Documentation, modified design, design files and build files created by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.

Camera Mount Adapters for the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit

Overview

This device contains 12 total adapters for all the buttons in the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit. To view or request a single adapter for a button from this kit, click the names of the respective adapters below:

The Camera Mount Adapters for Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit are inexpensive, easy, and quick to build adapters for all of the buttons in the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit. These adapters allow the buttons to be mounted on standard camera mounting equipment using the standard camera mount threads (¼”-20 UNC). These adapters were originally designed by ATMakers and more information on their switch mounts is available here.

Sizing

Size Photo of Button Photo of Camera Adapter
Large Large Button from Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit Large Camera Mount Adapter on wood background.
Small Small Button from Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit Small Camera Mount Adapter on wood background.
Trigger Variable Trigger Button from Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit Trigger Camera Mount Adapter on wood background.
Light Touch Light Touch Button from Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit Light Touch Camera Mount Adapter on wood background.

Camera Mounting Options:

Some possible mounting options using these camera mount adapters are tripods, flexible “gooseneck” mounts or a magic arm as shown below:

Logitech Trigger Button with adapter and magic arm stand.

Cost

The total cost of this device includes the cost of the PLA filament used to print the device, the T-Nut used to provide threads, and the two screws used to attach the device to the appropriate Logitech Button.

The total cost of the full kit (12 mounts) comes to approximately $26.15.

A 1/4″ washer and a ¼” – 20 screw (at least ½” length) are temporarily needed to install the T-Nut. If needed to purchase, this will increase the cost of the device to approximately $2.

A more complete Bill of Materials is provided in the BOM spreadsheet in the linked GitHub repository.

Build Instructions

This device consists of a single 3D-Printed part, two screws and one T-Nut. The necessary files and instructions for 3D printing as well as the assembly guide are in the linked GitHub Repository.

Skills Required

  • 3D Printing

Time Required

  • 3D printing ~11.57 hours
  • Assembly ~30 minutes

Tools

  • 3D Printer
  • Screwdriver
  • ¼”-20 machine screw (at least ½” length) and washer for assembly.

Components

  • 3D-Printed housing.
  • ¼”-20 Barbed T-Nut 5/16” barrel length.
  • 2x M3 x 8mm machine screws.

3D Printing

Refer to the 3D Printing Guide available in the Linked GitHub Repository.

Attribution

Original Design created by ATMakers under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license.

Documentation, modified design, design files and build files created by Neil Squire / Makers Making Change under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license